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Allen SmallOn the March 20, 2014 special broadcast of Exposing Faux Capitalism with Jason Erb, I interviewed Ontario Libertarian Party leader, Allen Small. Here is the audio.

We discussed the following issues:

  • The upcoming Ontario general election
  • The Ontario Libertarian Party’s plan to run a full slate of candidates in all 107 ridings in the upcoming election
  • Major parties changing their policies just to get votes, whereas Libertarian Party stands on principles
  • Reactions to increasing government intrusion in the private, peaceful activities of our lives
  • Municipal governance
  • Unnecessary permits
  • The proper role of government
  • Canada in infamous company with Cuba and North Korea, for not allowing private payment of primary health care by most residents
  • Ontario’s exemption for private sports clubs
  • Ontario used to have a vibrant private health care system in the early 1960s
  • Provincial health insurance coverage arbitrary and varies among provinces
  • You have a right to health, but not to force others to provide health care for you
  • Current health policy in Ontario costing time, money and lives
  • Toronto Mayor Rob Ford publicly admitting to what constitutes an indictable offence (crack possession and use)
  • Waterloo mayoral candidate Dave MacDonald’s letter to Premier Kathleen Wynne, calling for a provincially-mandated referendum on the Region’s light rail transit plans
  • Whether referendums are appropriate for issues that aren’t the proper function of government
  • The misconception of voting for an alternative party is “throwing your vote away”
  • Even a small percentage of support for alternative parties in a close election can cause other parties to “steal” ideas, and how that’s beneficial

I previously interviewed Allen on September 16, 2012.

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Here are some interesting statistics concerning how social media will affect the November 6, 2012 United States presidential election.

Social media can be used to provide a counterbalance to the two-party system lock on elections in the United States, whether it be the promotion of a third party candidate or a vote for “None of the above,” as some jurisdictions effectively allow by declining your ballot.

I have achieved successful outreach through various social media for my blog and radio program, and I have found that prominent personalities are more apt to respond through sites like Twitter and Facebook where the exchanges can be publicly seen, than through private email.

Consider, additionally, smaller social media sites, which are less apt to be controlled with content filters and more strict account restrictions, in the case that you have an important message to get out that may not be popular for most readers.

Provided by: Open-Site.org

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Julian IchimOn the October 14, 2012 episode of Exposing Faux Capitalism with Jason Erb, I interviewed anti-G20 activist, Julian Ichim, who has been a 2011, 2006, 2003 and 1999 federal or provincial election candidate.

Ichim described how his peaceful group was infiltrated by police prior to the 2010 G-20 summit in Toronto and how he was selectively charged with breaching a publication ban on releasing the pseudonym of an undercover officer who befriended and eventually betrayed him.

He described how groups like his are targeted because they offer alternatives that are outside the controlled political system.

During the interview, I shared this quotation from the Globe and Mail article, How police infiltrated groups planning G20 protests, of an admission by a police sergeant that police claim the authority to be above the law:

“[The officer]was saying ‘we need to take monkey wrenches and [damage construction]machinery,’” he said. “The occupation had a lot of support and he was talking about wrecking machinery, which tactically makes no sense.”

(Sgt. Chamberland said officers can break the law, but only with “prior, specific” permission from higher-ups.)

The Globe and Mail is, ironically, the same newspaper that broke the same publication ban in publishing the undercover officer’s name, yet wasn’t charged, which lends further credence to Ichim’s claim that the charges against him were politically motivated, and is yet another example of selective enforcement of our laws.

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John Turmel, the Guinness Book of World Records holder for the most contested elections, and proponent of an “Argentine Solution” for our debt woes, roasts the organizers who kicked him out of a corporate-controlled Kitchener-Waterloo byelection debate after he called for a floor vote for the inclusion of all candidates.

You can find my September 2, 2012 inteview of him here, on Exposing Faux Capitalism, starting in the second hour.

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English: Ballot Box showing preferential votingI first discovered in 2007 that Canadian citizens who are residents in Ontario can vote for none of the above by declining their ballot. I personally availed myself of that option upon concluding that I couldn’t in all good conscience support the Ontario Green Party as an alternative to the obviously detrimental three major parties: Liberal, Progressive Conservative and NDP.

The Election Act, 1990 words it this way:

Declined ballot

53. An elector who has received a ballot and returns it to the deputy returning officer declining to vote, forfeits the right to vote and the deputy returning officer shall immediately write the word “declined” upon the back of the ballot and preserve it to be returned to the returning officer and shall cause an entry to be made in the poll record that the elector declined to vote. R.S.O. 1990, c. E.6, s. 53.

The wording makes it sound as if you’re throwing away your vote, but in reality, it’s effectively a vote for none of the above.

The importance of the option to decline your ballot is that it clearly shows that the voter is dissatisfied with the available candidates, demonstrating a principled stand, and not being lumped in with those who are simply too lazy to vote, or those who spoil their ballot intentionally or accidentally.

There is no such option at the federal level, despite a 2001 bill (C-319) that would’ve provided Canadian voters with such an opportunity in subsequent elections.

Not only did the Waterloo Region Record omit mention of Libertarian candidate, Allan Dettweiler, it also omitted mention of the option to decline your ballot.

Are they really unaware of this option, or are they deliberately omitting reference to it?

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