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From Tom Woods’ October 7, 2014 podcast, Austrian economist takes on bestselling college text, chapter by chapter, I noted that there was no challenge mentioned of mainstream economics textbooks advocating governments borrowing from private banks to pay for their legitimate government services rather instead of issuing the money directly, interest-free.

Screen Shot 2014-10-13 at 12.53.58 PM-Tom-Woods-responded

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From the March 29, 2012 news release, Ontario Increases Funding Per Student:

The 2012-13 Grants for Student Needs (GSN) will rise this coming year to $11,189 per student. That is an increase of about $4,000 per student since 2003.

According to StatsCan, the median Canadian family income in 2013 was $76,000.

From the Ernst & Young 2013 Tax Calculator, the tax bill for an Ontario median family income household was $16,967, where less than 35% of that would be provincial tax.

That is, the provincial tax bill would not exceed $6000.

Does it make any sense that the per-student funding is higher than the median family household income?

When it is said that private education isn’t affordable for most with the same approach as public education, that is true, and that’s precisely because the public education system isn’t financially sustainable.

In a free market of allowing for an opt-out of public education, education wouldn’t be this expensive, just as food and basic shelter isn’t expensive enough for the vast majority of people in the Western world.

The claim is made that education is a public benefit and therefore the public should pay for public education, regardless of how many children one has who attend public school. Indeed education is a public benefit, but how are families incapable of providing that benefit to their own children, through private means?

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Health careFrom the January 8, 2014 article, Bosses shouldn’t ask sick workers for doctor’s note: OMA, in Canada’s largest newspaper, the Toronto Star, they falsely frame the sick note debate.

This is typical of the corporate-controlled mass media.

On one hand, we have the Ontario Medical Association president making the valid point:

“First of all, you don’t want to encourage people who have infectious diseases to go to their doctor’s office when it’s not necessary,” said Wooder, himself a family physician who has worked in Stoney Creek, near Hamilton, for 28 years.

And the other side makes a valid point:

John Kiru, executive director of the Toronto Association of Business Improvement Areas, said he respects an individual’s right to stay home to get healthy, but if someone is away for several days it’s entirely reasonable to demand a doctor’s note.

What’s completely left out of their framing, and deliberately so, is the issue of rationing.

Both sides, as presented, have completely legitimate positions, which are in tension with each other.

However, the true relief of this tension isn’t even being put on the table for discussion by the framers of the issue.

The true cure for this problem is allowing private funding of health care. Canada is one of only three countries — along with Cuba and North Korea — that don’t allow for individuals to pay privately for their own primary care.

Because it’s a fixed pool of resources, care must be rationed, instead of meeting actual demand through a market system.

Ironically, and what’s not mentioned in the article, is that doctors already can charge some money for writing sick notes, in addition to getting paid their customary fee through the public system.

That shows the unsustainability of a totally publicly-funded system for sick notes. A false solution may be provided to raise the amount that doctor’s can charge for such a note.

But what won’t be asked is why can’t we extend that to the entire health care system?

This is one of the many examples where the controlled, corporate media are deliberately framing an issue to restrict the debate to controlled outcomes.

For more on the proper see my article, Ron Paul right on health care: it’s not a right and it’s not a privilege — it’s a good.

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Interest-free monetary reformer, Anthony Migchels, is scheduled to be my guest on Exposing Faux Capitalism on March 17, 2013 from 1:30 to 3 PM Eastern on Oracle Broadcasting.

I previously interviewed Anthony on July 22, 2012, where he thoroughly exposed the Austrian School of economics as a controlled opposition front for debt-slavery promoting private banking interests.

His blog is Real Currencies.

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From lewrockwell.com. Released under the GFDL ...Lew Rockwell regularly features Paul Craig Roberts’ commentary — so long as it fits his anti-state narrative. When it doesn’t, despite being meritorious, it doesn’t get included for very transparent reasons.

No surprise, then, that we don’t find this February 14, 2013 Paul Craig Roberts article, While Left and Right Fights — Power Wins, published by LewRockwell.com in the intervening days.

Here is the reason why Rockwell didn’t include it, since Roberts correctly identifies the fundamental problem being the concentration of power — not its location:

The right is correct that government power is the problem, and the left is correct that private power is the problem. Therefore, whether power is located within the government or private sectors cannot reduce, constrain, or minimize power.

Previously, I wrote the article, Did Lew Rockwell and the Daily Bell influence Michael Snyder to abandon his call for nationalizing the Federal Reserve?

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Animation of a spinning barber pole

From the November 15, 2012 Toronto Star article, Woman denied haircut goes to Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario, in Canada’s largest newspaper, I posted the following comment:

“Private property rights

Why is a store owner required to do something on his own property against his will? It’s too bad that he’s challenging this on religious freedom, when it should be a matter of private property rights — to do with your own property as you wish, so long as you’re not depriving anyone else of their rights. And it’s not anyone’s right to get a haircut at a particular barber shop.

Nov 15, 2012 9:48 AM Agree (68) Disagree (22)”

After 13 hours, my comment is the 13th-highest-rated among over 600 comments. I’m pleasantly heartened to see the message of private property rights resonate with so many readers, given the false frame of the article in portraying it as a matter of gender equality vs. religious freedom.

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AlleyCity of Windsor, Ontario councilors have discovered that private property = better care.

From the October 8, 2012 Toronto Star article, Solution to fixing Windsor’s decaying alleys? Sell them to homeowners:

“The alleys are in bad shape and they’re just going to get worse because we don’t have the money to fix them,” Payne said.

Payne thought that it would be better for the city to just divest itself of the alleyways and asked for a report on the feasibility of selling them for a nominal fee to homeowners whose property is next to them.

The city has 150 kilometres of alleys — most of them in a state of disrepair, said Payne. The pavement is cracked. There are potholes, garbage and vermin in many of them, he said.

Reaction to the idea so far has been positive, Payne said. “I’ve had calls from homeowners who’ve said they’d like to buy the alleys behind their house.””

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