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Posts Tagged ‘1971’

With the news that the great boxing legend, Muhammad Ali, has passed away, here’s a 1971 BBC interview that the mass media won’t be airing any excerpts of, and you will soon see why!

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United States NotesAccording to the December 2012 report by the U.S. Treasury Dept., out of the $450 million Greenbacks issued during the American Civil War, there is an estimated $239 million still outstanding.

In 2013 dollars, this would be at least $10 billion, according to this inflation calculator. While not significant today, it’s significant that such a huge percentage of the Greenbacks are still in circulation, given that they were ordered to be taken out of circulation in 1971, so there have been many that are being privately circulated or collected.

While there were $500 million in interest-bearing bonds that were issued as backing for them, the money supply grew by a total of $950 million, and the interest-free Greenbacks provided significant funding for the Civil War, when the total debt was $2.7 billion by 1865, and no interest was due, nor will ever be due, on the $450 million issued, and nothing is stopping the U.S. government from returning to directly-issued interest-free currency, other than lack of political will.

As for the validity of the American Civil War, I have publicly stated on my radio program and in a recent public presentation that the States had the right to secede from the Union, and that President Lincoln and the Union were in the wrong. The effectiveness of the Greenbacks, and of any interest-free currency, is something that can be independently judged.

For more on United States Notes, see my articles:

1) Gary North gives the false impression that interest-free United States Notes are no longer valid

2) Gary North deliberately omits the fact that United States Notes are interest-free

3) Michael Badnarik on issuing interest-free fiat money like Lincoln did: “That’d be a step in the right direction”

4) Don’t just blame Lincoln for a national legal tender law — Washington signed one, too

5) The Federal Reserve lies about United States Notes (Lincoln Greenbacks)

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Gary northIn his February 1, 2012 article, Ben Bernanke: The Official Counterfeiter, Gary North says of U.S. Notes:

They were taken out of circulation in 1971, the year that Nixon took the country off the gold exchange standard. Today, we still see these words on Federal Reserve Notes: “This note is legal tender for all debts, public and private.”

The Federal Reserve’s Notes looked very much like the Treasury’s greenbacks until the U.S. Notes were taken out of circulation.

And they still do look like the Treasury’s greenbacks, since United States Notes are still valid legal tender, despite being taken out of circulation by the government (but not all private individuals) in 1971.

Here, he is giving the false impression that U.S. Notes are as irrelevant as currency in the United States since 1971 as a Roman coin with Caesar on it.

The U.S. Treasury Department states, as of April 29, 2012:

Both United States Notes and Federal Reserve Notes are parts of our national currency and both are legal tender.

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Dr. Ravi Batra, progressive economist and professor of economics at SMU, stated his support for a partial gold-backed currency as a replacement for the U.S. dollar.

On April 30, 2010, on the Thom Hartmann show, he stated at 57:30:

I don’t know if we will ever have one world currency in my lifetime, but currency should be backed up, partially at least, by gold, so that nobody can just inflate currency to fix the problem and leave workers dry. Wages have been stagnant at the same time, so we need to have some backing for the currency as well, and that should be gold.

The U.S. dollar was on a full gold standard until 1933, when most domestic gold was confiscated and transferred not to the U.S. Treasury, but the illegal Federal Reserve. After the confiscation, the price was raised from $20.67 USD to $35 an ounce. From then until August 15, 1971, the U.S. was on a partial gold standard, with foreign currency directly convertible into gold at the rate of $35 an ounce. Since then, gold has been able to freely float, and has hit all time highs since the economic turbulence of 2008, now over $1200 an ounce.

The call for a return to a gold-backed currency truly crosses the political divide, with a progressive economist singing the praises of a gold standard along with proponents of the libertarian Austrian School of Economics.

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