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Posts Tagged ‘Ayn Rand’

Doug NewberryI was interviewed by Doug Newberry of Crisis of Reality on January 24, 2013.

Here is the video, and here is the video of my January 9 appearance.

In my most recent interview, I discussed the false choice between Keynesian and Austrian economics, how Alex Jones is to his audience what Rush Limbaugh was to his audience back in the 1980s, the strange bedfellows of Karl Marx and Ayn Rand, how the banksters are using the dialectic of non-commodity money vs. a so-called free market gold standard to arrive at their government-guaranteed gold standard, and how Marx, Keynes, Rand, Greenspan and Mises don’t implicate the parasitic usurer, despite some of them being seemingly opposed to each other on many issues.

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Ayn RandOn the July 8, 2012 episode of Exposing Faux Capitalism with Jason Erb, George Whitehurst-Berry, former host of GCN’s “Crash! Are You Ready?,” identified several misleading points that he labelled disinfo, which were made in the following passage from Ayn Rand’s Atlas Shrugged (starting at 49:50):

Whenever destroyers appear among men, they start by destroying money, for money is men’s protection and the base of a moral existence. Destroyers seize gold and leave to its owners a counterfeit pile of paper. This kills all objective standards and delivers men into an arbitrary power of an arbitrary setter of values. Gold was an objective value, an equivalent of wealth produced. Paper is a mortgage on wealth that does not exist, backed by a gun aimed at those who are expected to produce it. Paper is a check drawn by legal looters upon an account which is not theirs: upon the virtue of the victims. Watch for the day it bounces, marked: ‘Account overdrawn.”

Ayn Rand:
– Failed to distinguish between debt money and sovereign, debt-free money.
– Claimed gold has an objective value, despite its value changing, like when Roosevelt’s Executive Order in 1933 seized gold at $20.67 USD an ounce, only for Congress to later increase its value to $35 an ounce.
– Falsely associated paper money with force, which doesn’t include local, voluntary currencies.
– Falsely identified debt-based paper money as a demand instrument — it’s a promise to pay.
– Failed to distinguish between privately issued debt-free money by individuals, and debt-based money by banks.

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In this interview by Lew Rockwell, libertarian and intellectual property lawyer Stephan Kinsella takes exception with Ayn Rand’s stance on intellectual property.

Starting at 11:11:

Rockwell: “Where did Rand go wrong?

If you didn’t believe that the U.S. Constitution’s view of patents and copyrights was exactly right, that you were a communist. But it seems to me she had very little argument for this.

Kinsella: “Her sort of religious adherence to the American scheme of government, which was almost perfect, in her mind.

Article I, Section 8 of the U.S. Constitution, “Powers of Congress,” includes:

To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries;

Note that it says: “to promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts,” and not to promote bottom line of patent holders, many of which are corporations these days, unlike in 1787 when the Founding Fathers wrote the Constitution.

The significance of that, to me, is that individuals are more likely to patent something out of their interest in profiting from their own creations, as opposed to those corporations that file new patents or buy existing ones to stymie progress.

Kinsella points out that Rand mistakenly believed that the person who first files for a patent gets it, whereas the U.S. is the only country that grants the patent to the first person to invent what is filed for.

However, that is only true in theory, as the 1984 patent for the fraudulent “HIV test” shows, which was granted to Robert Gallo of the National Institutes of Health, instead of the first test developer and patent filer, 2008 Nobel Prize winner Luc Montagnier, as documented in the 2003 book, Science Fictions. If you have enough sway with the Patent and Trademark Office, you’ll get your patent regardless of who the first inventor was.

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