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Posts Tagged ‘bill’

Stethoscope

On the May 27, 2012 episode of the Progressive Radio Newshour with Stephen Lendman, he revealed what Medicare was billed for his recent 15 to 20-minute ultrasound procedure.

At 13:37, he said:

For this simple procedure, the bill was $1875.

For more on health care, see my article, Medicare cost 744% more than forecasted by 1990, 25 years after its inception in 1965, and, The first step in health care reform: recognizing that health care is not a right.

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Tim Hudak

Since the Ontario Progressive Conservatives unveiled their October 2011 election platform, it’s become evident to me that their leader Tim Hudak is a shameless opportunist.

In 2009, when the federal Conservatives effectively bribed Ontario with $4 billion (around 40% of Ontario’s own money to begin with) to surrender its constitutional authority to directly impose a provincial sales tax and adopt a so-called Harmonized Sales Tax, Ontario PC leader Tim Hudak said how bad it was.

To me, it is simply not credible that he wouldn’t have taken the $4 billion from his federal cousins and implemented the HST like his Liberal competitors did.

Among his other shameless opportunistic claims include his promise to remove the 8% provincial portion of the 13% HST from hydro bills, and remove the debt retirement charge from them.

As one columnist pointed out, Hudak claims the debt retirement charge is no longer necessary, since the debt has allegedly been paid off.

Hudak was wise to go into politics, because he certainly wouldn’t have lasted long as a loan officer at a bank with his funny math. He claims that Ontario hydro customers have paid back the debt by having paid back the principal on it. Wouldn’t it be nice to say you’ve paid off your mortgage by only making principal payments and not any interest? Yes, so long as you’re not the bank.

While the Ontario Liberals, dubbed the Fiberals in some quarters, have a deservedly tarnished image as a result of some of their bogus promises, such as their failed promise not to raise taxes while going on to impose a health tax and eco fees, Hudak and the PCs aren’t any more credible in my view either.

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Barack Obama signing the Patient Protection an...

The constitutional way of signing a bill -- with a pen in your own hand

It wasn’t enough for President Obama to illegally go to war against Libya.

No, he had to violate another part of the Constitution. This time, by indirectly signing a four-year extension to the so-called Patriot Act with an autopen.

Article I, Section 7 of the U.S. Constitution states:

Every Bill which shall have passed the House of Representatives and the Senate, shall, before it become a Law, be presented to the President of the United States; If he approve he shall sign it

The clear meaning of this requirement is that the bill that has passed the House and Senate, which is to be presented to the President, has to be signed by him, and only him, and not some autopen based on his order.

If they can’t get the bill to him on time, then that should say something about the perils of waiting until the last minute, and about too many bills being passed by Congress. Taking shortcuts is no excuse, since the bill will become law if it’s still unsigned 10 days later (excluding Sundays).

The Constitution’s language also makes it clear that line-item vetos aren’t constitutional, and the U.S. Supreme Court ruled as such in 1998, after such a provision was signed into law in 1996 by President Clinton.

Therefore, we don’t need a Supreme Court decision to tell us what should be obvious by a plain reading, and the former Attorney General under George W. Bush, Alberto Gonzales, is no authority on the Constitution, in arguing autopen signings are constitutional, since he was the one who claimed that there was no constitutional habeas corpus protection in the constitution for Guantanimo detainees, despite Article I, Section 9 of the U.S. Constitution already recognizing a pre-existing writ of habeas corpus, in saying:

The privilege of the Writ of Habeas Corpus shall not be suspended, unless when in Cases of Rebellion or Invasion the public Safety may require it.

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