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Canada has held its sixth place ranking out of 177 ranked countries in the conservative Heritage Foundation’s 2013 Index of Economic Freedom, with an overall score of 79.4, with the U.S. holding its tenth place ranking, with an overall score of 76.0.

Canada now exceeds the United States in 8 out of 10 components of economic freedom, being surpassed only in government spending and labor freedom:

Canada vs. the United States
Property Rights 90.0 vs. 85.0
Freedom From Corruption 87.0 vs. 71.0
Government Spending 44.8 vs. 47.8
Fiscal Freedom 79.8 vs. 69.3
Business Freedom 91.7 vs. 90.5
Labor Freedom 82.3 vs. 95.5
Monetary Freedom 75.2 vs. 75.0
Trade Freedom 88.2 vs. 86.4
Investment Freedom 75.0 vs. 70.0
Financial Freedom 80.0 vs. 70.0

I’ll be discussing these results in an upcoming episode of my radio program, Exposing Faux Capitalism, airing every Sunday from 1 to 3 PM Eastern on Oracle Broadcasting.

Previously, I wrote the article, Still think Canada is more socialist than the United States? The joke’s on you.

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Colored Bullseye

As the investigation into the July 20, 2012 Colorado movie theatre shooting progresses, there remains a missing piece, and that is the discussion of private property rights.

While the political debate has been framed as more gun control versus less gun control, I see the real debate as private property rights versus no private property rights.

While more government-mandated gun control is palatable to many, an overt limitation of private property rights is less palatable, in the absence of fear-mongering.

The mass media –our self-appointed opinion leaders — frame the debate as more gun control versus the fear of another mass shooting, but for me, the debate is over private property rights versus no private property rights.

It should be evident that more gun control laws can’t stop all mass shootings. The solution, to me, is to protect the private property rights of business owners, and let them be responsible for their own security, and let their patrons assume full personal responsibility for their decision to patronize the business, barring negligence and malice.

If the business is negligent, there is the civil remedy of suing it for negligence, and if there is malice, there is also a possible criminal remedy.

Nearly everyone claims that they don’t want to be enslaved, but government security goons at movie theatres, and government laws barring all guns in private businesses, would serve that purpose.

Instead of enacting laws that grab guns from mostly law-abiding citizens, why not allow private property owners to provide for their own security, as they best see fit?

In a mass market like the United States, and especially in big cities, there would be the opportunity for some cinemas to offer more security, including full pat-downs, which are completely constitutional. I have no problem with private businesses choosing to mandate full pat-downs, since it’s up to individuals whether they choose to patronize that business.

For me, I’d prefer to take the risk, which is comparable to winning a lottery jackpot, of being a potential victim of a mass shooting, and not patronize a movie theatre with full pat-downs, but for others, they may not want to take that minuscule risk. If there was truly enough of a demand for such security, individuals would choose their theatre and other venues appropriately, despite what some cynical power-hungry freedom-grabbers in government may claim they want.

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George Whitehurst-BerryDespite being the second-highest rated GCN show among online listeners as early as February 2008, George Whitehurst-Berry’s Crash! Are You Ready? was abruptly terminated on April 13, 2012.

Despite the gradual rebranding of GCN from a patriot talk radio network to a more mainstream network, the show that replaced it, USA Prepares, 100% fits the old mould, and represents a retrogression from the rebranding.

If it was strictly a business decision, why doesn’t the archive link from the main GCN Listen page work for the show that replaced it?

Archive downloads usually account for more listeners than live listeners, and that was the case with Crash.

The fact that the link is still broken after nearly three full months is an indication to me of its relatively low listenership, and an indication that the termination of Crash wasn’t strictly a business decision.

Even long-time GCN broadcaster, Dr. Stan Monteith, has questioned whether his GCN broadcast was being sabotaged.

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The flags of Canada and the United States of A...

Some highlights, from Daily Bell regular contributor, Ron Holland, in his article, You’d Have to be Crazy To Start A Global Business in the USA — As a Public Company:

I’ll bet you don’t know that I may be the first person in recorded history to move voluntarily from the warm beach and golf resort of Hilton Head Island, South Carolina to cold and snowy Toronto, Canada. But Steve Wynn and many other entrepreneurs forced to deal with the multitude of regulatory agencies at the federal, state and local level would likely agree. America’s growing number of bureaucrats – all with their hand out to exchange fees for paperwork – can make it impossible to compete in the global economy from the US.

Frankly, I’m excited to pay equal or higher taxes to a new nation that never attempted to draft me to fight in Vietnam, doesn’t harass me or my wife when getting on a plane or crossing a border and has never made my life miserable. Also, Canada is sort of like Switzerland as the nation isn’t exactly the terrorist magnet of the world like the US and their economy is booming and its sovereign debt level is reasonable.

Note: Federal taxes are lower in Canada than in the U.S., overall. As of January 1, 2012, the top marginal personal income tax rate is 29% compared to 35%, top capital gains tax rate of 14.5% for all capital gains compared to 15% only for gains acquired over at least a year in the U.S., a top corporate tax rate of 16.5% compared to 35%, and no inheritance tax, compared to the top rate of 35% in the U.S.

Anyway, we continued to argue bureaucracy, tax-rates, crime, friendly law enforcement, victimless crimes, the Patriot Act and how the American sovereign debt, the dollar and the nightmare of our political institutions – except for the Ron Paul Campaign – threatens every American citizen and business. I lost the argument so I’m now moving to Canada to become CEO of a new start-up company with a viable solution for people suffering from the effects of unwanted hair loss and baldness – both males and females.

For more on why Canada is more pro-business than the U.S. these days, see:

1) Canada more economically free than the United States for a third year in a row: Heritage Foundation
2) Canada the best place for business in 2011: Forbes
3) Still think Canada is more socialist than the United States? The joke’s on you

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Image representing Sheryl Sandberg as depicted...

On Charlie Rose’s November 7, 2011 interview with Facebook founder, Mark Zuckerberg, and COO, Sheryl Sandberg, they talked about Facebook, social networking and privacy concerns, and then the topic of women in business leadership roles came up. (starting at 49:14)

I really think we need more women to lean into their careers, and to be really dedicated to staying in the workforce. I think the achievement gap is caused by a lot of things. It’s caused by institutional barriers and all kinds of stuff. But there’s also a really big ambition gap. If you survey men and women in college today in this country, the men are more ambitious than women. Until women are as ambitious as men, they’re not going to achieve as much as men.

I am reminded of a professor at the university I attended who told me about an initiative the Computer Science department created to attract more women to the program. Women accounted for around 20% of the enrollment, which was the lowest for any program at the university, and even notably lower than Engineering, overall.

She said they were surprised that the enrollment of women actually went down after they instituted their program, and they were baffled by this. Anyone who has taken an undergraduate degree in Computer Science, especially at The University of Waterloo, will know exactly why such a program isn’t very appealing to women.

The Computer Science program’s leather jacket was then known as the male equivalent of a chastity belt, and the computer lab was your second, and in some cases, your primary home.

I hope her reference to women being more ambitious than men is in the context of the business world, and not overall, since many women are ambitious mothers, and some cultures still fully appreciate the essential role they play, as Western culture once did.

Within the business context, I wholeheartedly agree with her, but at the same time, there are very good reasons why women aren’t in business leadership roles to the degree that their formal education and experience compares favourably to their male counterparts. Having worked with women in business leadership roles, I have personally observed that ultimately, the responsibility of taking care of their children rests mostly with them.

Eliminating the institutional barriers she referenced is one thing, but trying to convince someone that a certain field and position in an organization is desirable for them despite what their personal preferences continue to indicate strikes me as elitist.

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Canadian Flag

On October 4, 2011, Forbes announced that Canada is the best place for business in 2011, ahead of the United States in 10th place.

This is a continuation of a trend that began in 1993 when Canada started on a path to get its fiscal house in order, and accelerated in 2001 with the reckless policies of the Bush administration, which have since been aggravated by the Obama administration.

For my other articles on Canada’s economic ascendancy compared to its once great neighbour, see:

1. Once founded as a limited government whose powers are few and defined, the United States federal government is more centralized and expansive than Canada’s

2. Canada has one of the lowest average tariff rates in the world, with the 9th lowest out of 183 countries

3. The conservative Heritage Foundation labels Canada’s economy free and the United States as only mostly free

4. Still think Canada is more socialist than the United States? The joke’s on you

5. Canada more tax friendly for business than the United States: KPMG

6. Canada has more economic freedom than the United States: The Heritage Foundation

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The U.S. real estate collapse continues

Financial analyst Al Martin gave a stark and timely presentation of the continuing economic collapse on his August 28, 2010 monthly appearance on Erskine Overnight.

First segment

  • Existing home sales have fallen to levels not seen since the Korean war.
  • Unsold inventories of existing homes, 12 1/2 months, is the highest on record, not even reached during the depths of the Great Depression in 1933.
  • 44 of the last 48 months have been negative for mutual funds.
  • $500 billion annual drawdown of common stock mutual funds.
  • He said gold is the ultimate hedge. (In contrast, in November 2009, he effectively told gold shills to take a chill pill).
  • He said gold has always risen in a deflationary environment.

Second segment

  • In 2005, 26% of U.S. debt was financed internally — now 33%.
  • $500,000 house in Stockton, California in 2005, has defaulted three times since then. It dropped to $400,000 in Q1 2007, $300,000 in Q2 2008, $200,000 in Q3 2009, now being sold by the bank for $185,000.
  • He said historically, a bottom in the U.S. real estate market comes as the percentage of cash buyers increases. Now, 33% of all housing units sold are paid in full with cash. When it reaches 50%, he says the market will have reached a bottom.
  • 25 to 30 year-old first time homebuyers have fallen 70% since 2005.

Third segment

  • Defense Secretary Robert Gates announced 150,000 U.S. troops to be redeployed to the U.S. by 2014.
  • He said there is record global inventory for oil and copper: a 2 million ton net surplus for copper at the end of the year, and copper is at least a dollar per pound overvalued, and oil is overvalued by at least $20 a barrel.
  • They figured the world economy would perpetually grow by at least 2.2% per year, but 1% is now the new target.

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