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Posts Tagged ‘Canadian Mint’

I came across this May 28, 2008 article by Gary North on LewRockwell.com, where he claims gold coins produced by U.S. and Canada aren’t money.

This is what monetary policy is in the United States and Canada. Both nations produce gold coins. They are not really coins. They are not counted in the money supply. But they look like coins. People can buy them.

That’s an interesting claim — considering they are legal tender! (as the U.S. and Canadian Mint state)

On July 19, I wrote about Gary North’s claim that 21 years is a “medium term” investment in order to justify gold’s embarrassing performance from 1980-2001.

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From the historical London Fix data for 2009 on Kitco.com:

Gold went from a low of $810.00 USD an ounce on January 15, to a high of $1218.25 on December 3 — a 50% increase.

Platinum went from a low of $915.00 an ounce on January 15, to a high of $1500.00 on December 3 — a 64% increase.

Silver went from a low of $10.51 an ounce on January 15, to a high of $19.18 on December 2 — an 82% increase.

Palladium went from a low of $176.00 an ounce on January 15, to a high of $402.00 on December 31 — a 128% increase.

To those who say palladium has no historical use as a currency, consider that it has its own international currency code (XPD), along with gold (XAU), silver (XAG) and platinum (XPT), the Canadian Mint minted one ounce coins from 2005-2007 and in 2009, and you can purchase that and other palladium bullion here, and from other stores like Kitco.

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