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Posts Tagged ‘elections’

Subsequent to the October 27, 2014 Ontario municipal election, I wanted to offer my list of the good and bad of the Waterloo Region municipal election results, with a focus on my community of Waterloo.

The good:

– Dave Jaworsky, the candidate elected as Waterloo mayor really worked hard for the job, knocking on over 20,000 doors.

– Waterloo mayoral candidate Erika Traub had a strong second-place showing in her first-ever political campaign, with her own high level of commitment and care for the citizens of the community.

– That being a regional weatherman for over 40 years shouldn’t automatically make you the top candidate or get you elected, especially by refusing most interviews and not campaigning much during the summer, which ultimately resulted in a third place finish.

– The candidate who ran for Waterloo councillor because he was “bored” came in last place.

– The former Member of Parliament for Kitchener-Waterloo who suddenly declared for Waterloo regional councilor just before the deadline and didn’t get to or choose to participate in any media and voter vetting exercises besides a Rogers debate didn’t get elected.

– The number one challenger to Ken Seiling for Regional Chair, Jay Aissa, didn’t get elected after discrediting the anti-LRT (light rail transit) movement with his various antics, such as his failed court challenge with a shell organization consisting only of himself, unauthorized emails from anti-LRT petition signers to regional councillors, obnoxious robocalls, misleading flyers, a false debt projection claim, a legal threat for some Facebook posts and allegations of sign interference.

The bad:

– The return of both incumbent Waterloo regional councillors, Sean Strickland and Jane Mitchell.

– In 2010, Sean Strickland had said a 9% tax increase proposal was too high for light rail transit, only to support a 12.9% tax increase after the election.

– Prior to the 2010 election, Jane Mitchell had said she was against raising property taxes to pay for the light rail transit plan at the time, only to also support a 12.9% tax increase after the election.

– Not a single anti-LRT candidate elected, but understandable given some of the points mentioned above in the good section.

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G20 logo

A year later, the repercussions of the 2010 G20 conference in Toronto have been coming out in the news.

There were over 1000 arrests, more than 300 charges, 59% of which have since been dropped, and police violated the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms by arbitrarily detaining some protesters using a method called “kettling,” which the self-admitted liar, Toronto’s police chief, Bill Blair, says they won’t ever use again.

Despite being able to host the G20 in a remote location as the G8 conference was, or on nearby Toronto Island, I believe they intended to have it in the midst of downtown Toronto to capitalize on an inevitable mass conflict and crackdown.

On August 11, 2011, a Toronto judge ruled that on one particular night of the G20 summit, “[t]he only organized or collective physical aggression at that location that evening was perpetrated by police each time they advanced on demonstrators.”

I propose a novel response for future G20 conferences — a boycott. Just as political parties boycott elections when they know the vote will be rigged, I think a boycott is the appropriate response for future G20 conferences.

The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result. I fully expect a boycott to get no real traction if it even gets mentioned as a serious proposal in the mass media, but I sincerely think it is the way to go, as I see the powers that be standing to make further gains from the current unorganized and predictable approach of its alleged opponents.

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Arms of Canada

From the elections.ca Handbook for Nomination Contestants, Their Financial Agents and Auditors:

Contribution limits

Any individual who is a Canadian citizen or permanent resident of Canada may make these contributions:

up to $1,000 in total in any calendar year to a particular registered party
up to $1,000 in total in any calendar year to the registered associations, nomination contestants and candidates of a particular registered party
up to $1,000 in total to a candidate for a particular election who does not represent a registered political party
up to $1,000 in total to the contestants in a particular leadership contest
[405(1)]

Yet, when it comes to voting requirements, you have to be a Canadian citizen:

You are entitled to vote in federal elections and referendums if you are a Canadian citizen, and will be 18 or older on polling day.

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