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Posts Tagged ‘exclusive jurisdiction’

Canada’s federal government blatantly disregarded Ontario’s provincial law requiring private security firms and their guards to be licensed, in the run-up to the 2010 G8/G20 summits.

As the Toronto Star reported on June 8, 2010:

The security firm awarded a government contract to provide private guards for the G8 and G20 summits is not licensed in Ontario.

Contemporary Security Canada, a Vancouver-based company that did private security for the 2010 Winter Olympics, was hired by the RCMP to provide about 1,100 private guards for the Toronto and Huntsville summits.

Security industry members say licensing is a rigorous process that normally takes six to eight months.”

“The clock is ticking down to the G20. For the aim of public safety, we’re moving forward with the process to have them licensed quickly with all the due diligence necessary,” said Laura Blondeau, spokeswoman for Minister Rick Bartolucci.

Blondeau said the Ministry became aware of the CSC’s contract no more than two weeks ago.

This story shows how:

1) Canada’s federal government doesn’t bother to familiarize itself with provincial law, or simply doesn’t care about it.
2) Even Canada’s largest province plans on buckling under the pressure of the federal government.
3) While claiming “public safety,” by moving to license the security firm in time for the summits, in half the usual time, Ontario’s government is indicating that their current licensing requirements are overburdensome, or they’re cutting corners and putting public safety at risk.

Canada’s provincial governments are granted exclusive jurisdiction over certain powers by the Canadian Constitution, just as U.S. states are by the U.S. Constitution, and the federal government can no more disregard provincial law than provincial governments can disregard federal law in their respective exclusive jurisdictions.

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