Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘federal spending’

Previously, I uncovered that the CIA is overstating Canada’s government spending by more than 200%, by inconsistently reporting all government spending for Canada, and only federal spending for the U.S., despite both having a federal system of government.

Looking through Canada’s numbers again, I noticed its massive exports hemorrhage from 2008 to 2009. This time, the CIA’s numbers are correct.

From Canada’s entry in The World Factbook:

Exports:
$323.4 billion (2009 est.)
country comparison to the world: 11
$459.1 billion (2008 est.)

Exports decreased by a whopping 30% from 2008 to 2009, despite the downturn not hitting Canada hard until September 2008, when, as one example, the Canadian dollar declined by 20% relative to the USD in less than a full month.

By comparison, U.S. exports “only” fell by 14% from 2008 to 2009, despite officially being in recession since December 2007.

The CIA states that export figures are stated in U.S. dollars based on the official exchange rate. Given an estimated GDP of $1.335 trillion for 2009, Canada’s exports only accounted for 24% of its GDP. Imports for 2009 were estimated to be $327.2 billion, resulting in net exports of -$3.8 billion.

In a forthcoming article, I’ll expand on my discussion from July 1 on “Crash! Are You Ready?” on why claims of a higher dollar being bad for exports are overly simplistic, and how it’s been completely counterproductive for Canada’s central bank and leading politicians to be slavishly devoted to keeping the Canadian dollar below par with the USD. In doing so, they argue for and support government intervention for 24% of the economy at the expense of the other 76%.

Read Full Post »

With the conservative Heritage Foundation’s 2010 ranking of Canada as more economically free than the United States, the CIA’s overstatement of Canada’s government intervention in the economy is particularly striking.

From Canada’s Economy section of the CIA’s World Factbook, we see:

GDP (official exchange rate):
$1.335 trillion (2009 est.)

Budget:
revenues: $514.5 billion
expenditures: $547.2 billion (2009 est.)

Government spending is reported to be 41% of Canada’s GDP in 2009.

From the United States‘ Economy page, we see:

GDP (official exchange rate):
$14.43 trillion (2009 est.)

Budget:
revenues: $1.914 trillion
expenditures: $3.615 trillion (2009 est.)

Government spending is reported to be 25% of the United States’ GDP in 2009.

From the official U.S. federal budget numbers for 2009, total spending was $3.518 trillion. The CIA’s estimate was off by less than 3%.

From Canada’s federal budget numbers for 2009, total spending was $237.8 billion or only 17.8% of Canada’s GDP, seven percentage points lower than that of the U.S., with the CIA’s estimate off by more than 200%.

Since both countries have federal governments, and the CIA is reporting the federal budget numbers for the U.S., the same should be true for Canada.

As further evidence the CIA’s data for Canada’s government spending is incorrect, the conservative Heritage Foundation ranked Canada as more economically free than the United States in 2010. If Canada truly had 41% of its GDP tied up in government spending versus 25% for the U.S, how could and why would the Heritage Foundation rank Canada as more economically free?

Read Full Post »

On January 27, 1996, President Bill Clinton stated during his 1996 State of the Union Address, “The era of big government is over.”
The federal budget numbers are from the 1996 and 2009 budgets.

THEN: No government bailouts
NOW: Bailouts could reach $23.7 trillion

THEN: Total federal spending was $1.61 trillion
NOW: $3.1 trillion

THEN: Government was already big.
NOW: The PATRIOT Act, Department of Homeland Security, two unconstitutional wars, federalization of the National Guard, warrantless wiretaps, 30+ “Czars.”

THEN: Defense spending was $262.2 billion
NOW: $651.1 billion

THEN: The federal debt was $5.27 trillion
NOW: $10.41 trillion

THEN: “Our economy is the healthiest it has been in three decades.”
NOW: The economy is the worst it’s been in six decades.

THEN: “We have the lowest combined rates of unemployment and inflation in 27 years.”
NOW: The highest rate of unemployment in 26 years.

THEN: “America is selling more cars than Japan for the first time since the 1970s.”
NOW:  GM and Chrysler went bankrupt, Toyota overtook GM as the world’s largest car producer in 2008 for the first time ever.

THEN: “And for three years in a row, we have had a record number of new businesses started in our country.”
NOW: The highest number of bankruptcies in the past four years since the 2005 bankruptcy overhaul.

Read Full Post »