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Posts Tagged ‘Freedom Party’

On the June 14, 2014 episode of Exposing Faux Capitalism with Jason Erb, I discussed the following recent issues of the past week in the audio here:

Ontario’s recent election, Libertarian breakthrough, Freedom Party’s balanced budget gimmick, Ellen Brown got the most votes of any third-party contender for California Treasurer, and Canada’s Supreme Court decision requiring warrants for all internet user requests.

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English: Tim Hudak.

From the August 14, 2012 Waterloo Region Record article, PCs to take ‘nothing for granted’ in byelection fight: Hudak, Ontario PC Party leader Tim Hudak said:

Every time we pay and use those important tax dollars that go to interest on our debt, it’s taking critical dollars away from the front lines we want to move forward in health care and education.

Did he forget that it was his party that ran up a $5.6 billion deficit and handed out extra millions in interest payments to bankers, despite claiming they would balance the budget?

It’s yet more rhetoric from a typical big party politician, and why I won’t be voting for any of them this time around either.

Previously, I wrote the 2011 article, Ontario PC leader Tim Hudak’s promises shows he’s a shameless opportunist.

And just because a party has freedom in its name doesn’t mean I’ll vote for it, as I demonstrated with my article, Why I’m not voting for the Ontario Freedom Party in this 2011 provincial election.

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Pic for WikiProject Political parties and poli...

I won’t vote for any of the mainstream candidates or parties, which should be evident to any regular readers given my scathing criticism of politics as usual.

The Green Party, while not mainstream in some ways, including not having an Ontario provincial member of Parliament, is out of consideration, since they fully support the global warming scam.

Therefore, in this election, I was left with one other party choice — the Freedom Party.

I strongly support their platform of restoring personal private payment options for health care, as every other country has in the world, except, apparently, Cuba and North Korea.

Another platform of theirs I strongly support is making spy meters optional, and eliminating all public funding for private power generation and  so-called green energy initiatives.

Where I part company with them, however, is their platform to repeal various excise taxes like the gasoline tax and liquor taxes. Excise taxes are one of the few taxes that I think are legitimate, since you as a resident have the choice of paying that tax or not.

They also pledge to repeal the $2.9 billion health premium, yet the obvious question becomes — how will that revenue be made up? Based on a cursory analysis of their pledges, it would seem that the kind of cost savings required wouldn’t be met by the shortfall in revenue their policies would result in.

Another platform I strongly oppose, which basically tipped the balance in favour of me not voting for their local candidate, is their plan to provide for the election of Ontario’s federal senators. I wrote about why I think Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s Senate reform plan is unconstitutional. Beyond that, I think the last thing we need are more elected representatives for the money power to manipulate and make voters feel they are really making a positive choice for.

Some people have called for abolishing the Canadian Senate, as did the late NDP leader, Jack Layton, while many in the Western provinces have called for a so-called Triple-E Senate (Equal, Elected, Effective). However, I call for a Senate where the senators are appointed by the provincial legislatures, which is a system like the United States had prior to 1913, which I believe served its federal government well before it eventually became more centralized and expansive than Canada’s without direct state representation.

They also criticize the leaders of the major parties for letting the Toronto School Board decide how to handle Muslims praying in some of its schools. I was surprised that PC Leader Tim Hudak, didn’t take the opportunity to demagogue that issue.

I think he took the appropriate position, because I favour local school control, and if anyone feels the Board or school is acting illegally, they can take them to court. The last thing I think the education system needs is more centralized control, as should be evident from the U.S., which has a federal Department of Education and has some of the worst primary and secondary school outcomes in the Western world.

Therefore, I intend to vote for “none of the above,” which you can officially do in Ontario, by declining your ballot.

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