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Posts Tagged ‘health care’

From the June 2, 2016 episode of TVO’s the Agenda with Steve Paikin, the guest, claimed, 2 minutes in, that a report on mental health costs said that the annual cost due to lost productivity in Canada was $51 billion, and is projected to go into the trillions in 30 years. Given that Canada has a current GDP (PPP) of $1.6 trillion, that would be 3% of the economy in annual costs today, yet it’s supposed to go up to at least $1 trillion, when, in 30 years, the GDP will be $2.9 trillion (given a highly generous growth estimate of 2% annually), and the cost will be at least 34% of GDP?

The host had every reason to shocked by the claim. And, folks, just because it’s on a serious television program, doesn’t mean you shouldn’t immediately spot the claim as patently bogus.

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Exposing Faux Capitalism with Jason Erb: Episode 13, September 16, 2012: Interview with Ontario Libertarian Party leader, Allen SmallOn the December 22, 2015 episode of Exposing Faux Capitalism with Jason Erb, I interviewed Ontario Libertarian Party leader, Allen Small. If you support the principles of free enterprise, private property rights and individual freedom, then please consider donating to the OLP, where you can donate up to $400 and receive 75% back as a tax credit when you receiving your 2015 tax refund as early as March or April 2016.

We discussed the following issues:

  • Limited beer sales at licensed Ontario supermarkets since December 16, 2015
  • Premier Kathleen’s Wynne call for marijuana to be sold at LCBO stores once it’s legalized federally
  • High Occupancy Toll Lanes coming to Greater Toronto Area highways
  • Health care reform, including when will Canada join the rest of the world, including France and Sweden, in allowing the private payment for primary health care, in order to reduce wait times and improve service
  • Partial privatization of Ontario Power Generation
  • Charges against two Liberal aides in the gas plants scandal
  • The opportunity to donate and receive a 75% tax credit for your donation up to $400 in the 2015 tax year.

For my past interviews with Allen, see here:

1) March 20, 2014

2) September 16, 2012

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On the October 10, 2015 episode of Exposing Faux Capitalism with Jason Erb, I covered the following issues:

A unique analysis of the upcoming October 19, 2015 Canadian federal election, with a focus on foreign policy and election stunts. I also talk about health care and Uber.

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On June 25, 2015, from the article, ‘Words no longer have meaning’: U.S. justice Scalia apoplectic on ‘pure applesauce’ Obamacare ruling, I pointed out Justice Scalia’s Obamacare wording hypocrisy, where he said that “words no longer have meaning” in reference to the majority 6-3 decision by the U.S. Supreme Court on whether “the State” referred only to the 13 U.S. States that have set up health care exchanges, or whether it also includes the U.S. federal government.

Scalia’s hypocrisy relates to him saying that the Second Amendment pertaining to the right to keep and bear arms allows for reasonable restrictions when it clearly says that right “shall not be infringed.”

So who is he to claim that “words no longer have meaning” in the context of this case, and given the scathing nature of his dissenting opinion, I find it appropriate to call him out on his hypocrisy in this regard.

From an intensive layman’s study of the U.S. Constitution over the years, I tend to suspect he’s right with his decision in this case, as the words “the United States” is used in both the Constitution and the United States Code to refer to the U.S. federal government, whereas “States” are used to the several states.

Check out the comments section for my various comments and responses, including from someone who chastised me for allegedly using hyperbole in saying:

Scalia has no credibility in taking exception with the Court’s interpretation of words, since he misinterprets the Second Amendment, which clearly says the right of the people to keep and bear arms “shall not be infringed,” in saying that reasonable gun control limits are allowed.

For more on Justice Scalia, see my article, Charlie Rose’s interview with U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia.

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20 years later, the Ontario Ministry of Health finally caught up with me about my old health card

First introduced in 1995 by the unpopular Ontario NDP government as a fraud reduction measure, all eligible Ontarians became subject to eventually being required to obtain a new photo ID health card, as a replacement for the old red-and-white cards.

The government laughably claimed that they would phase out all old cards by the year 2000. Fifteen years after that “deadline,” they finally caught up with me. I received a letter in the mail, asking me to obtain a photo ID card in order to retain my taxpayer-funded health care.

Some people originally thought a photo ID card was a preferred option, until they were warned that it wasn’t a good idea, because they’d have to renew it every five years and pay money for it (of course).

The funny thing is that I knew someone who, around 2006, got one of these letters in the mail and ignored it at first, thinking they would go away, only to later get a final notice of his health care being cut off if he didn’t comply. Meanwhile, he knew others who still had their cards — highlighting the seeming absolute arbitrary nature of the process. I feel somewhat special that I managed to avoid these letters for nine more years than him, despite no apparent reason for deserving such luck.

Another odd thing is how plain Social Insurance cards are still being issued by the federal government, which are required for income tax reporting and to have most jobs, unless they are under-the-table, yet the federal government still hasn’t found the need to eliminate that even bigger potential of fraud

The slackness of the replacement of these cards is typical for such a government program. It’s like the provincially-funded and operated GO Transit trains, of which I have taken two recent trips on, and they never bothered to verify whether I had purchased a ticket, and had I been the dishonest type, could’ve ridden for free. No privately-owned business would do business in this way, nor would any private business take 20 years to replace their customers’ authentication documents if fraud really was an issue that tangibly affected their bottom line.

The health card replacement plan, pitched as a way of combating fraud, was a fraud of its own sort from the beginning, since it was implemented as a feel-good measure by an unpopular government that was flagging in the opinion polls and was defeated so badly that originally lost official party recognition in the legislature after the 1995 election.

Instead of reforming the system, such as joining every other country in the world except for Cuba and North Korea, in allowing for private funds to be used to pay for primary health care, as a supplement to the taxpayer-funded system, the government decided to take the easy way out and pretend they cared about fraud when they had already wasted money on the Skydome white elephant in Toronto just so the province’s capital city could say it had the latest in stadium technology with a fully retractable roof and a Jumbotron, and go over budget by hundreds of millions of dollars.

As for that notice, I’ll be responding, soon enough. Apparently I get two more notices before they will cut me off, but even if I am in need of services, I can later apply and get reimbursed for the costs. It seems that is ironically one of the few ways to have transparency in the system, of knowing exactly how much health care costs us — aside from looking up obscure line items in a billing table — and privately fund your primary health care — but without getting reimbursed with your taxes.

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A libertarian friend of mine has a new political podcast series from a much-needed Canadian perspective. It’s called the Political Paradox Podcast.

From the first two episodes:

The Political Paradox Podcast – EP 002 – Healthcare, Government Bans and The Olympics
Posted: Tue, 18 Nov 2014 15:00:00 GMT

This week, what is the REAL cost of “Free” healthcare in Canada? You won’t believe what Ontario is looking to ban next. Plus, the outrageous list of IOC demands that prompted Norway to pull out of it’s Olympic bid.

The Political Paradox Podcast
Posted: Tue, 04 Nov 2014 15:00:00 GMT

It’s the first ever episode of the political paradox podcast. On today’s show, Paul explains what exactly a libertarian is. Then, he shares his story of how he became a libertarian.

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I have extended interview invitations to the Ontario Libertarian Party candidates in Kitchener-Waterloo, and here is my 20-minute interview with Patrick Bernier, OLP candidate in Kitchener Centre. You can listen to the audio here.

We talk about the OLP’s plans for empowering individuals and not government, with regard to health care and education, which are always big issues, provincially, and locally as well.

We talk about the unaffordable $11,189 2012-2013 Ontario per student grant for the public education system, and student-driven alternative options that would be more effective.

For health care, we discussed patient-focused care, and ways to improve efficiencies and drive costs down to the level of other countries with better care.

Recently, I conducted an in-depth interview with Ontario Libertarian Party leader Allen Small on March 20, 2014.

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