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Posts Tagged ‘income’

From the March 29, 2012 news release, Ontario Increases Funding Per Student:

The 2012-13 Grants for Student Needs (GSN) will rise this coming year to $11,189 per student. That is an increase of about $4,000 per student since 2003.

According to StatsCan, the median Canadian family income in 2013 was $76,000.

From the Ernst & Young 2013 Tax Calculator, the tax bill for an Ontario median family income household was $16,967, where less than 35% of that would be provincial tax.

That is, the provincial tax bill would not exceed $6000.

Does it make any sense that the per-student funding is higher than the median family household income?

When it is said that private education isn’t affordable for most with the same approach as public education, that is true, and that’s precisely because the public education system isn’t financially sustainable.

In a free market of allowing for an opt-out of public education, education wouldn’t be this expensive, just as food and basic shelter isn’t expensive enough for the vast majority of people in the Western world.

The claim is made that education is a public benefit and therefore the public should pay for public education, regardless of how many children one has who attend public school. Indeed education is a public benefit, but how are families incapable of providing that benefit to their own children, through private means?

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English: Handcuffs Handcuffed Handcuff Hinge H...

IRS officials in the United States have claimed that paying your personal income taxes is voluntary, as seen in Aaron Russo’s documentary, America: Freedom to Fascism.

While Canada’s tax collection agency, the Canada Revenue Agency, is considered to be more reasonable than the IRS, as evidenced, for example, by the ability to anonymously settle taxes in arrears, there is this August 20, 2012 Canadian Press article, Canada looking to collect on millions in unpaid fines, which states:

The federal government currently has several options to collect outstanding fines. They include negotiating a payment schedule with the debtor, seizing assets or garnishing wages, setting off the debt against any income tax refunds and sales tax credits, suspending or denying federal licences and permits, or — as a last resort — sending a debtor to jail.

Around 150 people were jailed between April 2010 and March 2011 for refusing to pay their fines, the annual report notes.

Therefore, I don’t feel bad for my strong words when a canvasser for Plan Canada was no longer interested in making her pitch to me after I had pointed out why I won’t knowingly donate money to any organization that directly participates in the AIDS scam, because of thugs like Robert Gallo and Anthony Fauci sitting on their taxpayer-funded perches and having their agents forcibly extract money for their scam ultimately at the literal barrel of a gun if you refuse to pay any part of the $300 billion in federal AIDS funding to date.

There is, however, a distinction between voluntary and involuntary taxes, and their propriety, as I pointed out in my article, The “taxation is theft” blowhards.

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Paul Volcker, former head of the Federal Reser...

In an October 24, 2011 interview with Charlie Rose, former Fed Chairman and fellow Bilderberger, Paul Volcker, laughed at the great increase in wealth disparity in the United States over the past 10 to 15 years, and at Americans for not speaking out more forcibly against it (starting at 18:27).

But there is a feeling — which I’ve been a little surprised has not been expressed more forcibly before — the distribution of income, which has changed very radically in the last 10 or 15 years. And you have a situation in the United States where there’s been almost no growth in real income for the average family for 10 or 15 years, but way at the upper end of the income distribution, there’s been an enormous increase, of a kind that didn’t take place in my lifetime or even in your lifetime. (laughs)

Rose responded with “it’s unbelievable!” — which is only genuine if he’s referring to Americans not speaking out more forcibly against it, and not the fact that it’s taken place, since he holds the Triple Crown for membership in globalist organizations where policies are discussed and made, and he regularly features fellow members on his program.

Rose posted a short 4-minute YouTube clip from the nearly half-hour interview, conveniently omitting reference to fellow Bilderberger Paul Volcker laughing at fellow Americans.

As to what the goal is of groups like the Bilderbergers, the CFR and the Trilateral Commission is — Bilderberg attendee, former CFR Director and Trilateral Commission founder David Rockefeller said it best in his own memoirs (emphasis mine):

Some even believe we are part of a secret cabal working against the best interests of the United States, characterizing my family and me as ‘internationalists’ and of conspiring with others around the world to build a more integrated global political and economic structure — one world, if you will. If that is the charge, I stand guilty, and I am proud of it.

For more on Charlie Rose and his guests, see my articles:

1) Charlie Rose pulled the transcripts of his shows

2) Corporate welfare recipient Morgan Stanley Chairman working for China

3) IMF director says IMF “forces coordination” and “there’s no other solution” to Greek-style austerity

4) According to CharlieRose.com, the financial crisis ended on March 10, 2009

5) Former Fed Chairman Paul Volcker admits the Federal Reserve is private and he attended Bilderberg Group meetings

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Combination of four currency symbols

Warren Buffett correctly points out that he pays less tax as a percentage of his income than his secretary does, as a result of her receiving nearly all of her income as personal income, while Buffett receives most of his as capital gains and dividends.

Thanks to the Bush tax cuts that were extended by President Obama, the man who promised change, long-term capital gains and dividends are taxed at only 15%, compared to a top rate of 35% for personal income over $200,000.

This is portrayed by the business community as a good thing, and even by some people making far less than $200k a year, with the justification that it’s important to promote investment.

I used to have the view that the government providing a preferential incentive for investing was a good thing, until I gained a better understanding of the proper role of government, and how preferential government incentives can lead to artificial boom-and-bust cycles.

You have three options with your money: You can either spend it, save it, or invest it.

Is spending a lot of your new money ever a good thing compared to investing it? Yes, for example, in the case of high inflation and low interest rates — as is increasingly becoming the case in 2011.

But why bother spending your money now when you can get a big tax advantage on dividends and capital gains, and can even claim any interest paid on borrowed money for such investments as a tax deduction?

Instead of spending your money and possibly putting more people back to work, more money is given to companies so that the executives at the top can award themselves more in stock options and bonuses, and hedge fund managers can make a killing off of manipulating the market, as Jim Cramer candidly admits.

If the market feels that more spending or saving is the order of the day, what business is it of government to create an artificial demand for more investment?

The problem of over-investment is acutely seen with so many would-be retirees who are dependent on their investments for retirement, and got a rude awakening in late 2008 when they depended on a government bailout in order to prop up the market back to its pre-2008 crash levels. Had they not been given an artificial incentive to invest, many would’ve made savings more of a priority, and put their money into less risky places than in a housing market propped up by junk mortgages sold as triple-A securities, and a stock market propped up by the financial services sector with its fraudulent financial vehicles.

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