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Posts Tagged ‘insurance’

Stefan MolyneuxOn his July 11, 2013 appearance on the Nomad Capitalist Report, Stefan Molyneux revealed (at 4:17 with pause words removed):

This is true in the U.S. in some ways, just as it is in Canada. You have massive and perverse incentives to up the cost of surgeries. And, so for instance, when I got a lump removed from my neck, they gave it a biopsy, and I was originally sent a bill for $4400, for the biopsy. And, through negotiating, I said, “no, no, no, I’m not insured — I pay privately. And they wrote back and they said oh, oh, ok, well then it’s only $400, and we negotiated down from there.

For more on the problems with U.S. government-regulated and funded health care, see my articles:

1) A $1875 Medicare ultrasound bill versus my $100 OHIP bill

2) What Medicare costs: Stephen Lendman’s $1875 ultrasound bill

3) Medicare cost 744% more than forecasted by 1990 — 25 years after its inception in 1965

4) The first step in health care reform: recognizing that health care is not a right

For more on Stefan Molyneux, see my articles:

1) A heated discussion between Stefan Molyneux and Jan Irvin on gold

2) Stefan Molyneux does hate the state, and Walter Block of the Mises Institute, doesn’t

3) The most free societies sow the seeds of their own destruction?

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Photo of the Cofrentes (Spain) nuclear power p...

On April 3, 2011, I wrote the article, Who is behind enenews.com?, in which I wrote:

Who is behind enenews.com, the site known as Energy News, which, for the time being, has been focusing solely on the fallout of the Japanese nuclear disaster?

The short answer is, we don’t know.

It later came out that it is run by an anonymous, self-described lawyer with a penchant for posting hyped and fear-based articles about nuclear power.

As I commented on June 22, 2011:

Enenews.com keeps putting out the scary headlines, but what they’re not going to do is get into the unnecessary reasons for the disaster in the first place.

If nuclear power wasn’t so heavily subsidized, if the government got out of building nuclear plants and if the private sector could get insurance to build them and the consent of neighbouring property owners who would be most affected, then go ahead with building more nuclear plants.

But no, it’s about putting out the fear.

Sadly, as of August 15, 2012, according to Alexa.com, the site is more popular than ever, and predictably, its author still isn’t advocating any solutions.

My proposal for immediate redress of the current situation concerning nuclear power — which the most rabid anti-nuclear activists and the most laissez-faire free market advocates should find common ground in supporting — is this:

  • Eliminate all government funding for nuclear power research
  • Eliminate all government funding for the operation and insurance of nuclear plants
  • Sell all government-owned nuclear plants to the private sector, or close those that aren’t sold
  • Require the consent of local property owners for the continued or new operation of nearby nuclear power plants

It may be that the implementation of these proposals eventually results in the end of nuclear power as we know it, and I think that could prove to be the case, but the longer time goes without any well-known, so-called “green” organizations advocating such proposals, the more I question their commitment to their espoused principles.

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The province of British Columbia

Recently, someone relayed an account of the province of British Columbia’s tax and medical system, and here is part of my response:

The capital gains tax rate in B.C. isn’t 48%. Taxtips.ca shows that the highest capital gains tax rate there is only 21.85% for any gains on income over $128,800 for 2011. For the average B.C. taxpaper, it is far less, at either 11.35% or 14.85%.

As for the 12% sales tax, it has a 5% federal component and a 7% provincial component. That is, the B.C. government is only taking 7%, whereas the 5% sales tax is paid anywhere in Canada. While few like paying taxes, it’s a constitutional tax in both Canada and according to the principles and letter of the law of the original U.S. Constitution.

You said you had a friend in B.C. who had to wait four and a half years for a hip replacement. The B.C. government reports that between July 1 to September 30, 2010, the median wait time for hip replacements was only 11.6 weeks.

That’s for people admitted to a waiting list based on a doctor’s medical assessment. If you’re not admitted, then you’re also not getting any hip replacement in the U.S. if you don’t have the money or private health insurance to pay for it.

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Hourglass

I heard from a former employee of a dot com bubble company that went bankrupt in 2000 and was still being fought over in court four years later, and I thought that was ridiculous.

Confederation Life, one of Canada’s insurance companies, was forced into liquidation in 1994. As of December 7, 2010, their site reports:

The Liquidator anticipates that there will be one final distribution from the estate. Given the uncertainty surrounding the realization of the remaining non-monetized asset in the estate, the Liquidator is of the view that it will not seek Court approval for the final distribution until the middle of 2011. As soon as the Liquidator is of the view that it is appropriate to recommend approval for the final distribution, it will bring a motion for approval to the Court. At this point, the Liquidator is unable to project a date for such motion.

Las Vegas should start taking bets on when the liquidation will be completed, if they haven’t already.

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