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Posts Tagged ‘International Monetary Fund’

Charlie Rose in 2010 at the Tribeca Film Festival

Triple Crown Charlie (CFR and Trilateral Commission member and Bilderberg attendee) Rose has pulled the transcripts of all the interviews on his site, CharlieRose.com.

Maybe it was considered an unjustified expense, or perhaps it’s because people could easily look up and see what some of the top globalists have said about their plans for the world.

Here are the most recent ones I covered, which received significant alternative media coverage:

January 25, 2011: Corporate welfare recipient Morgan Stanley Chairman working for China

December 19, 2010: IMF Director says IMF “forces coordination” and there’s “no other solution” to Greek-style austerity

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Speaking to Triple Crown Charlie (CFR and Trilateral Commission member and Bilderberg attendee) Rose on December 16, 2010, IMF Director Dominique Strauss-Kahn ran cover for failed Euro and IMF interventionist policies.

I’m a big advocate of the single currency,

Greater economic integration often leads to greater political integration, as demonstrated by the progression in Europe from the European Coal and Steel Community to the European Economic Community to the European Union and then the Euro.

and it provides a lot of results.

Yes, like the 110 billion Euro Greek bailout and the 85 billion Euro Irish bailout.

CHARLIE ROSE: Can you have austerity and growth at the same time?

DOMINIQUE STRAUSS-KAHN: Well, I would answer no.

He’s obviously unaware of or deliberately omitting that the U.S. had unprecedented economic growth from 1945-1950, in the face of federal budget cuts of over 50%.

But the problem in the banking sector is limited to small number of banks. The big banks are safe and so I think it’s manageable.

Safe like three of the five biggest investment banks in the U.S., one of which went bankrupt (Lehman Brothers) and two others which collapsed (Bear Stearns and Merrill Lynch) and were bought up at a fraction of their 52-week highs by the biggest commercial banks? Or safe like the biggest commercial banks that were bailed out by the federal government’s $700 billion Troubled Asset Relief Plan and the Federal Reserve’s $3.3 trillion bailout fund they fought so hard to keep secret?

Or how about Iceland’s currency going south by 80% in just four months in 2008 as a result of their three big banks going bankrupt? Or the UK’s two biggest banks being effectively nationalized? Or… You get the idea.

Speaking on the decision required by Euro countries to get out of the current crisis, Strauss-Kahn said (emphasis added):

It’s politically very difficult. The decision will be made in the center which will overcome the sovereignty of the nations.

He’s saying that the only acceptable decision will be made in what he refers to as “the center,” and admits it will overcome the sovereignty of the nations involved.

DOMINIQUE STRAUSS-KAHN: Well, I think a few things. First, the Greek government is very bold. And take action as it has to be done. Of course people don’t like it. But you know, the man on the street also have to understand they absolutely needed. The Greek economy was at the edge of a cliff, and there were no other solution.

Bob Chapman has repeatedly proposed an alternative solution for the Greeks, which I wholeheartedly endorse. Namely, defaulting on all their bankster-issued debts, pulling out of the Euro, going back to the Drachma, slashing exorbitant entitlements, and going through the immediate pain over the next five years at a minimum that is likely to be less severe than what will happen if they continue down the path laid out by the IMF and other globalist bankster institutions.

So the question today is that many may believe wrongfully in my view that the crises is over and go back to their domestic problem and forget all about the global coordination. So our role is to try to force this coordination among the G20 countries.

Strauss-Kahn admits that the IMF forces action on countries, despite insisting otherwise throughout the interview. Prior to the crisis in 2008, the G8 was the primary economic organization until 2009, when it was announced the G20 would be “the new permanent council for international economic cooperation,” with far greater clout to force solutions on sovereign nations.

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Previously, I wrote how the United States Postal Service has been undercutting the U.S. dollar since 2003, with IMF Special Drawing Rights (SDRs) accounting for the majority of their international accounts.

SDRs are a synthetic currency introduced by the International Monetary Fund in 1969, which are weighted based on the U.S. dollar, the Euro, the British pound and the Japanese yen.

As of 2010, there are only two currencies pegged to IMF SDRs, both since 1995. They are the Czech Koruna and the Jordanian Dinar. However, by 2012, the Czech Koruna is scheduled to be replaced by the Euro.

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Since 2009, I have heard two prominent financial analysts repeatedly make the claim on multiple programs, including two major ones with over a million weekly listeners, that gold and silver are all you can rely on. But what about platinum?

How much can you really rely on gold and silver, when gold was confiscated by the U.S. government in 1933 at the height of the Great Depression, and silver in 1934. And how can you specifically rely on gold when it’s the commodity most controlled by the international bankers, and a reserve currency for national and international banks?

Unlike gold and silver, a confiscation of platinum is unlikely for several reasons:
1) It’s not a reserve currency for national and international banks like gold is.
2) It isn’t as widely held as gold and silver.
3) Its historical investment and currency use is shorter than gold and silver.
4) Its decreased demand relative to gold and silver in a recession, due to its overwhelming industrial demand, leading to better performance during the subsequent recovery.

When I mention platinum as an investment comparable to gold and silver, I’ve been told that platinum has little to no historical use as a currency. As I wrote previously, platinum has an international currency code along with gold, silver and palladium. Since 1988, one ounce platinum coins from the Royal Canadian Mint have a legal tender value of $50. Since 1997, American Platinum Eagles from the United States Mint have a legal tender value of $100.

From 1967-1978, the first and only regularly minted gold coin available for the masses was the South African Krugerrand. However, due to trade sanctions imposed by many Western countries on South Africa for their policy of apartheid, the Krugerrand’s availability was severely limited from the 1970s until 1994.

It got some serious competition in 1979, when the Royal Canadian Mint began minting Canadian Gold Maple Leaf coins. Just nine years later, at the height of sanctions on the import of Krugerrands, one ounce platinum coins were minted by the Royal Canadian Mint between 1988, and continued to be minted until 2002, and were reintroduced in 2009.

Not only can you rely on platinum as a historically non-confiscatable metal, you can also rely on it historically trading at a substantial premium over gold. Over most of the past decade, platinum has traded at a 50 to 100% premium over gold. At a 38% premium over gold at the end of January 2010, it still has plenty of room to appreciate to its historical trading premium relative to gold.

Recently, platinum outperformed gold in 2009, and for the first month of 2010.

Now ask yourself why you’re being told that gold and silver, and not platinum, are the only things you can rely on, why gold and silver are being pushed so much, and not platinum, and why most of you haven’t heard these things about platinum before.

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On Saturday, November 14, 2009, financial analyst Al Martin effectively told gold shills to take a shill chill pill, on Erskine Overnight. In the fourth segment of the first hour, he stated that:

  • The IMF gave India a 0% interest-free loan to purchase 200 tons of their 403 metric tons of gold they planned to sell, because they wanted to prevent it from going to market.
  • The week before, India announced a huge sale of silver.
  • China refused a deal to buy the remaining 203 tons of gold from the IMF.
  • China said it’s not a huge buyer of gold.
  • New mine production of gold continues to increase.

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