Posts Tagged ‘Karl Marx’

Karl Marx (1818-1883)

I called into the March 20, 2013 episode of Truth Hertz with Charles Giuliani (at 1:49:04) about Karl Marx, the Austrian School of economics, and gold.

I mentioned how Engels encouraged Marx to write more about economics, and how Marx said he didn’t want to write anymore economic “scheisse” (sh*t), and how Marx was really the front man for others, in being associated with a secret society (The League of the Just), and it was Engels who posthumously published the second and third volumes of Das Kapital.

The important part of the plank in the Communist Manifesto calling for a central bank is that it will have an exclusive monopoly on credit, and that the credit is supposed to be tied to gold, as we learn from reading Marx’s Das Kapital.

Whether it’s Marx, Mises, Rand, Rothbard or Greenspan, they all lead you to the same place of a gold standard, whether government-regulated or so-called free market.

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On the February 17, 2013 episode of Exposing Faux Capitalism, I covered the following issues, among others:

What Gary Franchi’s Next News Network won’t be covering, Lew Rockwell “banned” this Paul Craig Roberts article, the not-so strange bedfellows of Mises and Marx, the primary purpose of money as a medium of exchange, and Austrian economics no alternative.

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Doug NewberryI was interviewed by Doug Newberry of Crisis of Reality on January 24, 2013.

Here is the video, and here is the video of my January 9 appearance.

In my most recent interview, I discussed the false choice between Keynesian and Austrian economics, how Alex Jones is to his audience what Rush Limbaugh was to his audience back in the 1980s, the strange bedfellows of Karl Marx and Ayn Rand, how the banksters are using the dialectic of non-commodity money vs. a so-called free market gold standard to arrive at their government-guaranteed gold standard, and how Marx, Keynes, Rand, Greenspan and Mises don’t implicate the parasitic usurer, despite some of them being seemingly opposed to each other on many issues.

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Hammer and sickle

In criticizing the privately-owned Federal Reserve, some point to the establishment of a central bank as one of the 10 planks of the Communist Manifesto.

That’s true, but it’s not the whole story.

The fifth plank of The Communist Manifesto is:

Centralization of credit in the banks of the state, by means of a national bank with state capital and an exclusive monopoly.

Therefore, the Communist Manifesto doesn’t just call for a central bank, but a public central bank, and not just a public central bank, but a public central bank with an exclusive monopoly of credit.

Criticism of the Federal Reserve is justified on many levels, including constitutional and moral, but not on the basis of it being a plank of the Communist Manifesto.

The central United States Treasury is authorized by the Constitution, as is Congress’ exclusive public power to coin money, but the Founding Fathers certainly weren’t communists, since communism, as later espoused by Marx and Engels, is in complete opposition to the form of government the United States had which made it so economically successful.

Congress’ exclusive public power to coin money doesn’t prohibit private individuals or non-corporate associations of individuals from coining currency, nor from them accepting it as payment for goods and services or private debts. Nor does that power have to be exercised, just as its power to declare war doesn’t have to be exercised.

Nearly all detractors of the Federal Reserve I’ve heard from point to the failure of all three central banks under the Constitution of the United States, but fail to point out that they were all majority privately-owned, which is an important omission, since privately-owned entities tend to serve the interests of their shareholders and not some wider group, such as the general public.

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The first step in my health care reform plan is simply this: recognizing that health care is not a right.

How can I be so cruel as to say that? How can anyone be so cruel as to say otherwise?

To say that health care is a right means that you have a right to someone else’s labour. Do others have a right to your labour, or is your labour your own, to use it as you see fit?

Communism is a system that holds that some have the right to the labour of others. Communism co-founder, Karl Marx, stated in 1875: “from each according to his ability, to each according to his need.

I understand the well-meaning intentions of those who say that health care is, and should be, a right. However, a right is an entitlement. How can you be entitled to the work of a doctor, a nurse, or any other health professional, as a matter of birth?

If health care truly was a right, then that was quite the oversight by the Founding Fathers of the United States, in not including it in the Bill of Rights in 1789. But it wasn’t an oversight. They recognized that it wasn’t a right.

The consequence of recognizing that health care is not a right, I believe, is to put the focus back where it properly belongs, as to who is ultimately responsible for their own health — the individual. There are those who are unable to properly care for themselves, as there has been since the dawn of time. Those people should be appropriately cared for, as matter of public interest, not as a matter of right, as well as all others. But just because it’s in the public interest to take care of all individuals, doesn’t make it a right, nor necessitate the method of care.

These days, health care is often taken to mean expensive diagnostic equipment, treatment with expensive drugs, expensive private health care plans with high overhead, and unsustainable government health plans, such as Medicare, which, as I previously documented, cost 744% more by 1990 than previously estimated at its inception, in 1965.

Modern health care has regressed from the basic principles of the father of modern medicine, Hippocrates, who stated: “Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food.

Instead of a proactive, preventative approach to health by the individual, the focus has regressed to a reactive, expensive third-party approach, and this must change.

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Supporting recovering Austrian Economics addicts and their families

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Supporting People and the Commonwealth and resisting the Money Power by defeating Usury