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Posts Tagged ‘liberties’

Supreme Court of Canada building

On a recent radio program, in comparing the liberties of Americans to the residents of other countries, the host said Canadians have no “right” to an attorney.

I agree with that, and the same applies in the United States, and all across the world.

There’s no right to an attorney, since a right doesn’t require the consent of others, and a right to an attorney implies the forced labour of attorneys.

However, even if talking about the privilege of an attorney, the 2010 Supreme Court of Canada’s decision specifically related to no “right” to have an attorney present when being interviewed by police. The Court recognizes the right of a suspect to remain silent, and so as long as they do, the “right” to an attorney in questioning isn’t relevant.

While Canada may currently have less of a protection on that front, the Supeme Court of Canada hasn’t ruled like the U.S. Supreme Court has recently ruled 8-1, that Americans can have their doors busted down without a warrant if police suspect evidence of a crime is being destroyed.

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According to Thomas Luongo, writing for LewRockwell.com, it does.

He states:

Since being “converted” to both libertarianism and, by extension, Austrian economics I have developed a passion for money.

I’d classify myself as a libertarian, and I’m certainly no supporter of the Austrian school of economics, primarily due to its advocation of a gold standard, as described in this article by Lew Rockwell, founder of the Mises Institute.

For me, a libertarian is someone who believes that limited government is the most likely to protect the liberties of the people whom it governs, and that shouldn’t necessitate an economic system based on a scarce resource such as gold.

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Among the most famous of quotations attributed to Thomas Jefferson, is this one:

If the American people ever allow private banks to control the issuance of their currency, first by inflation and then by deflation, the banks and corporations that will grow up around  them will deprive the people of all their property until their children will wake up homeless on the continent their fathers conquered.

But did Thomas Jefferson really say that? That’s what I had thought, especially after hearing it repeated by so many people on so many different programs and web sites. Then, one day, I decided to verify it for myself, and was surprised by what I found.

Bartleby, famous for its books of quotations, states:

Although Jefferson was opposed to paper money, this quotation is obviously spurious. Inflation was listed in Webster’s dictionary of 1864, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, but the OED gives 1920 as the earliest use of deflation.

Another authoritative dictionary, Merriam-Webster, reports the first use of the word deflation, in any context, dating back to 1890 — 64 years after the death of Thomas Jefferson.

As Bartleby hints at, one shouldn’t throw the baby out with the bath water. Even if Jefferson didn’t say that, in whole or in part, it’s consistent with his beliefs and actions.

The full significance of this quotation will be addressed in several subsequent articles.

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