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Posts Tagged ‘medical’

Canadian health careCanada’s Supreme Court ruled on October 18, 2013 that a Toronto man who has been on life support for three years cannot be removed from it without the consent of his family, despite doctors deciding it is no longer medically necessary.

Two Sunnybrook doctors have lost their bid to unilaterally remove a severely brain damaged patient from life support, but they still have the option of going to a provincial tribunal to try to overrule his family’s wishes, the Supreme Court has decided.

What I find shameful about the doctors in question, is not that they are arguing that life support is no longer necessary, but that they argue that “they were not actually providing medical treatment by keeping the man on life support.”

Of course providing life support is medical treatment. It’s not free to make, purchase or operate those machines, and providing related support.

Their argument strikes me as a cynical attempt to end life support, perhaps under a completely valid medical basis, under false pretenses, because of the constraints of the law.

However, I also find it shocking that the Supreme Court decision would claim a right to medical treatment at the involuntary expense of others. The cynicism is furthered by that “right” subjected to being arbitrarily denied on the basis of the decision of a subsequent government panel, which perfectly illustrates the inability of governments to grant positive rights.

I am sympathetic to the concern of “death panels”, which is what the provincial government panel effectively can serve as. Also, doctors can even be pushed into that role because of pressures in the socialized health care system, and this is exactly why I support private money for primary health care in Canada, which is what all other countries in the world allow for, except for Cuba and North Korea.

For more on health care, see my articles:

1) The first step in health care reform: Recognizing that health care is not a right

2) Ron Paul right on health Care: It’s not a right and it’s not a privilege — it’s a good

3) Stefan Molyneux reveals the perverse incentives in the U.S. health care system

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Stefan MolyneuxOn his July 11, 2013 appearance on the Nomad Capitalist Report, Stefan Molyneux revealed (at 4:17 with pause words removed):

This is true in the U.S. in some ways, just as it is in Canada. You have massive and perverse incentives to up the cost of surgeries. And, so for instance, when I got a lump removed from my neck, they gave it a biopsy, and I was originally sent a bill for $4400, for the biopsy. And, through negotiating, I said, “no, no, no, I’m not insured — I pay privately. And they wrote back and they said oh, oh, ok, well then it’s only $400, and we negotiated down from there.

For more on the problems with U.S. government-regulated and funded health care, see my articles:

1) A $1875 Medicare ultrasound bill versus my $100 OHIP bill

2) What Medicare costs: Stephen Lendman’s $1875 ultrasound bill

3) Medicare cost 744% more than forecasted by 1990 — 25 years after its inception in 1965

4) The first step in health care reform: recognizing that health care is not a right

For more on Stefan Molyneux, see my articles:

1) A heated discussion between Stefan Molyneux and Jan Irvin on gold

2) Stefan Molyneux does hate the state, and Walter Block of the Mises Institute, doesn’t

3) The most free societies sow the seeds of their own destruction?

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Jerome HauerJerome Hauer, the man billed as a counter-terrorism expert on 9/11, who provided a self-assured explanation that planes alone were capable of bringing down the two World Trade Towersthe professional opinions of 1700+ architects and engineers notwithstanding — studied for a PhD for a “Medical Response to Acts of Nuclear Terrorism” at Cranfield University from 2007-2011, according to his LinkedIn account as of August 20, 2012.

Will Hauer be putting his PhD to practical use?

If so, based on what didn’t happen on 9/11, we should be asking very basic questions about him and his impeccable foresight the next time around, given his track record of warning the Bush administration to go on Cipro before the 2001 anthrax attacks, and of claiming to know so much about civil engineering and bin Laden’s capabilities even before bin Laden became a household name.

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White toothOn the July 1, 2012 episode of my show, Exposing Faux Capitalism, a caller raised the issue of problems with common dental treatments (starting at 1:35:14).

I relayed my personal story of not wanting to have an X-ray, and being satisfied with an examination of my teeth by my dentist, and how I was informed that it wouldn’t be possible for her to continue treating me if I refused to have an X-ray.

I even asked if it would be okay if I signed a waiver stating that I wouldn’t sue as a result of any problems arising from not having an X-ray at that particular time, and was told that still wouldn’t be acceptable.

The reason? Not because she didn’t agree to that, but because her Dental Association prohibited it as part of their so-called professional treatment standards.

This is an example of how the medical establishment gets in between medical professionals and their patients, despite the focus being on government and private health insurance company interference.

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Coast to Coast AM

After four years of unanswered private communications and almost zero coverage of the $300 billion AIDS scam by Coast to Coast AM, it is now time to fire the opening salvo of my public appeal to host, George Noory.

Here was my email to him on September 15, 2011 (links added):

George,

Your guest last night had things to say about the medical establishment’s appalling handling of Lyme Disease that are eerily parallel to HIV/AIDS. When will you end your gatekeeping of HIV/AIDS? There are over 300 individuals with MDs and 600 with PhDs who have publicly expressed their call for a reappraisal of the HIV/AIDS theory, and their voices aren’t being heard in the mass media for the same reasons Lyme disease isn’t being adequately addressed.

Jason

Here are the relevant quotes from the September 14, 2011, Lyme disease show description:

“there’s no disease on this planet that’s more controversial at this point.” He traced the issues back to the original description of Lyme disease in 1975, where Grier claimed that doctors “got a lot of things wrong with this new disease.” Going forward, he said, the medical establishment has merely “built up on this mythology that they had started” and, even in modern times, testing for Lyme disease is only about 25% accurate.

“They call it the ‘practice’ of medicine, but nowadays medicine is a fascist state,”

Alongside that problem is the lack of funding for research into the disease. Believing that a key aspect in understanding the sickness lies in its affect on the human brain, Grier said that he’s been trying for over a decade to get funding from the NIH and CDC for such studies and has been continuously rebuffed. He surmised that this lack of support is because of trepidation from the medical community that his research would “prove them all wrong” about the true nature of the disease.

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The province of British Columbia

Recently, someone relayed an account of the province of British Columbia’s tax and medical system, and here is part of my response:

The capital gains tax rate in B.C. isn’t 48%. Taxtips.ca shows that the highest capital gains tax rate there is only 21.85% for any gains on income over $128,800 for 2011. For the average B.C. taxpaper, it is far less, at either 11.35% or 14.85%.

As for the 12% sales tax, it has a 5% federal component and a 7% provincial component. That is, the B.C. government is only taking 7%, whereas the 5% sales tax is paid anywhere in Canada. While few like paying taxes, it’s a constitutional tax in both Canada and according to the principles and letter of the law of the original U.S. Constitution.

You said you had a friend in B.C. who had to wait four and a half years for a hip replacement. The B.C. government reports that between July 1 to September 30, 2010, the median wait time for hip replacements was only 11.6 weeks.

That’s for people admitted to a waiting list based on a doctor’s medical assessment. If you’re not admitted, then you’re also not getting any hip replacement in the U.S. if you don’t have the money or private health insurance to pay for it.

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