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Posts Tagged ‘New Zealand’

English: Canada Post LLV in service

In her January 9, 2012 Truthout article, Saving the Post Office: The Models of Kiwibank and Japan Post, Ellen Brown argues why the New Zealand and Japanese postal services are a model for saving the U.S. Postal Service.

She highlights them because they have public banking operations.

She states:

The USPS is a profitable, self-funded venture that is not supported by the taxpayers.

I don’t know where she got the claim that they are profitable, since CNNMoney reported in February 2011:

[I]t suffered a loss of $329 million in the first quarter of federal fiscal year 2011. That compared with a loss of $297 million a year earlier.

If you think a $329 million loss in a single quarter is bad, consider what happened in the third quarter:

The U.S. Postal Service posted a net loss of $3.1 billion in its third quarter and warned again it would default on payments to the federal government if Congress did not step in.

She criticizes Stephen Zarlenga’s American Monetary Act as being too radical of a change.

On the same basis, I propose a very simple model for saving the U.S. Postal Service, and that is Canada Post.

It’s been profitable for the past 16 years, it reported its most profitable year in 2010 despite the ongoing financial crisis, and boasts the third-lowest postage rates among developed countries, despite Canada’s exceptionally low population density.

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In their 2011 Index of Economic Freedom, the Heritage Foundation designated Canada’s economy as “free,” while the United States embarrassingly slipped down into its list of “mostly free” economies.

Canada was ranked in 6th place just behind other “free” economies like Hong Kong, Singapore, Australia, New Zealand and Switzerland, while the U.S. was ranked in 9th place, sharing company with “mostly free” economies like Uruguay in 33rd place.

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The conservative Heritage Foundation, no friend of socialism, has ranked Canada ahead of the United States in economic freedom, at 7th and 8th place, respectively.

From their 2010 Index of Economic Freedom, the top 10 countries with the most economic freedom in descending order are:

  • Hong Kong, Singapore, Australia, New Zealand, Ireland, Switzerland, Canada, United States, Denmark, and Chile.

Ranked by Business Freedom, Trade Freedom, Fiscal Freedom, Government Spending, Monetary Freedom, Investment Freedom, Financial Freedom, Property Rights, Freedom from Corruption, and Labor Freedom, Canada beats the U.S. on 6 out of 10, ties on Investment Freedom, and falls behind only on Government Spending, Monetary Spending, and Labor Freedom.

Particularly embarrassing to the U.S. should be Canada’s ranking of 90% for Property Rights versus 85% for the U.S., given that the U.S. Constitution explicitly provides for just compensation for the taking of property, and the Canadian Constitution does not. Instead, it leaves property rights to the jurisdiction of the provincial legislatures. Even the Chinese Constitution provides for compensation for the taking of property, whereas Canada’s doesn’t.

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