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Posts Tagged ‘North Korea’

Health careFrom the January 8, 2014 article, Bosses shouldn’t ask sick workers for doctor’s note: OMA, in Canada’s largest newspaper, the Toronto Star, they falsely frame the sick note debate.

This is typical of the corporate-controlled mass media.

On one hand, we have the Ontario Medical Association president making the valid point:

“First of all, you don’t want to encourage people who have infectious diseases to go to their doctor’s office when it’s not necessary,” said Wooder, himself a family physician who has worked in Stoney Creek, near Hamilton, for 28 years.

And the other side makes a valid point:

John Kiru, executive director of the Toronto Association of Business Improvement Areas, said he respects an individual’s right to stay home to get healthy, but if someone is away for several days it’s entirely reasonable to demand a doctor’s note.

What’s completely left out of their framing, and deliberately so, is the issue of rationing.

Both sides, as presented, have completely legitimate positions, which are in tension with each other.

However, the true relief of this tension isn’t even being put on the table for discussion by the framers of the issue.

The true cure for this problem is allowing private funding of health care. Canada is one of only three countries — along with Cuba and North Korea — that don’t allow for individuals to pay privately for their own primary care.

Because it’s a fixed pool of resources, care must be rationed, instead of meeting actual demand through a market system.

Ironically, and what’s not mentioned in the article, is that doctors already can charge some money for writing sick notes, in addition to getting paid their customary fee through the public system.

That shows the unsustainability of a totally publicly-funded system for sick notes. A false solution may be provided to raise the amount that doctor’s can charge for such a note.

But what won’t be asked is why can’t we extend that to the entire health care system?

This is one of the many examples where the controlled, corporate media are deliberately framing an issue to restrict the debate to controlled outcomes.

For more on the proper see my article, Ron Paul right on health care: it’s not a right and it’s not a privilege — it’s a good.

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Pic for WikiProject Political parties and poli...

I won’t vote for any of the mainstream candidates or parties, which should be evident to any regular readers given my scathing criticism of politics as usual.

The Green Party, while not mainstream in some ways, including not having an Ontario provincial member of Parliament, is out of consideration, since they fully support the global warming scam.

Therefore, in this election, I was left with one other party choice — the Freedom Party.

I strongly support their platform of restoring personal private payment options for health care, as every other country has in the world, except, apparently, Cuba and North Korea.

Another platform of theirs I strongly support is making spy meters optional, and eliminating all public funding for private power generation and  so-called green energy initiatives.

Where I part company with them, however, is their platform to repeal various excise taxes like the gasoline tax and liquor taxes. Excise taxes are one of the few taxes that I think are legitimate, since you as a resident have the choice of paying that tax or not.

They also pledge to repeal the $2.9 billion health premium, yet the obvious question becomes — how will that revenue be made up? Based on a cursory analysis of their pledges, it would seem that the kind of cost savings required wouldn’t be met by the shortfall in revenue their policies would result in.

Another platform I strongly oppose, which basically tipped the balance in favour of me not voting for their local candidate, is their plan to provide for the election of Ontario’s federal senators. I wrote about why I think Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s Senate reform plan is unconstitutional. Beyond that, I think the last thing we need are more elected representatives for the money power to manipulate and make voters feel they are really making a positive choice for.

Some people have called for abolishing the Canadian Senate, as did the late NDP leader, Jack Layton, while many in the Western provinces have called for a so-called Triple-E Senate (Equal, Elected, Effective). However, I call for a Senate where the senators are appointed by the provincial legislatures, which is a system like the United States had prior to 1913, which I believe served its federal government well before it eventually became more centralized and expansive than Canada’s without direct state representation.

They also criticize the leaders of the major parties for letting the Toronto School Board decide how to handle Muslims praying in some of its schools. I was surprised that PC Leader Tim Hudak, didn’t take the opportunity to demagogue that issue.

I think he took the appropriate position, because I favour local school control, and if anyone feels the Board or school is acting illegally, they can take them to court. The last thing I think the education system needs is more centralized control, as should be evident from the U.S., which has a federal Department of Education and has some of the worst primary and secondary school outcomes in the Western world.

Therefore, I intend to vote for “none of the above,” which you can officially do in Ontario, by declining your ballot.

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North Korea, formally known as the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, is often referred to in the mass media as “The Hermit Kingdom.” There is much justification for that designation.

It came as a surprise to me that you can actually obtain a tourist visa for North Korea. I first read an article in 2007 about how there are a few Canadians who visit each year on a tourist visa.

That is unlike Saudi Arabia, for instance. From visahq.com, “The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia does not issue tourist visas.” There is the irony that you can get a tourist visa to visit an “Axis of Evil” country, as branded by the George W. Bush administration, yet can’t get one to visit a designated ally.

The travel advisories issued by the Canadian government, which has among the best relations with most nations of the world, North Korea has the second-lowest travel risk, with 22 countries having a higher level of risk.

The countries with an “avoid all essential travel” advisory are: Angola, Burundi, Central African Republic, Congo, Democratic Republic of Congo, East Timor, Eritrea, Iran, Lebanon, Liberia, Madagascar, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, and Pakistan.

The countries with an “avoid all travel” advisory are: Afghanistan, Chad, Guinea, Iraq, Somalia, Sudan and Yemen.

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