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Posts Tagged ‘republic’

The Fifteen Steps to Corporate FeudalismI arranged the July 31, 2012 interview with Dennis Marker, author of Fifteen Steps to Corporate Feudalism, on Dr. Stan Monteith’s Radio Liberty (available for a limited time).

Dr. Stan differed with Marker on several points, as I do, including his use of the word democracy instead of republic, and his support for federal government spending beyond its originalist constitutional boundaries.

Overall, Dr. Stan agreed with most of Marker’s points, as I do.

For my July 15, 2012 interview with Marker, see here.

I previously arranged interviews for Dr. Walter Block and Dr. Peter Duesberg.

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CFR and Trilateral Commission member Fareed Zakaria tells the truth about the Bill of Rights on his August 10, 2010 interview on Charlie Rose.

“It is about fundamental rights that we believe in. That is what the Bill of Rights was about. The Bill of Rights is an anti-democratic document.”

However, throughout his interview, he contradicts himself by referring to the United States as a “democracy,” while, as I demonstrate in my article, The United States: A republic, not a democracy, the U.S. Constitution makes no mention of democracy, and to the contrary, specifically requires a republican form of government.

See the open letter I wrote him on February 23, 2009, in response to his recent article in Newsweek.

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Article IV, Section 4 of the U.S. Constitution states:

The United States shall guarantee to every State in this Union a Republican Form of Government”

The word “democracy” is nowhere to be found in either the U.S. Constitution or in that of any of the constitutions of the 50 states.

Despite constant popular reference to the United States as a “democracy,” from the Greek words demos (people), and kratein (to rule), the U.S. Constitution, the “supreme Law of the Land,” states otherwise.

The ancient Greeks, the originators of Western civilization, didn’t regard democracy as ” the worst form of Government except all those other forms that have been tried from time to time,” as Winston Churchill did. They regarded it as the worst form of government — period.

In a democracy, the majority can infringe on the rights of the minority. This is often done under the guise of “the public good.” In a republic, the rights of everyone are protected.

What is the significance for us today? It’s to recognize the difference between the two, to recognize what the United States was set up as (a republic), what it has been gradually transformed into (a democracy), and the dangerous effects of that transformation.

Since the financial crisis of 2008, the effects have been very evident: the banking bailout, stimulus package, private health insurance mandates, all under the guise of “the public good,” infringe on the rights of all Americans, at the expense of privileging some.

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