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Posts Tagged ‘sales tax’

Tim Hudak

Since the Ontario Progressive Conservatives unveiled their October 2011 election platform, it’s become evident to me that their leader Tim Hudak is a shameless opportunist.

In 2009, when the federal Conservatives effectively bribed Ontario with $4 billion (around 40% of Ontario’s own money to begin with) to surrender its constitutional authority to directly impose a provincial sales tax and adopt a so-called Harmonized Sales Tax, Ontario PC leader Tim Hudak said how bad it was.

To me, it is simply not credible that he wouldn’t have taken the $4 billion from his federal cousins and implemented the HST like his Liberal competitors did.

Among his other shameless opportunistic claims include his promise to remove the 8% provincial portion of the 13% HST from hydro bills, and remove the debt retirement charge from them.

As one columnist pointed out, Hudak claims the debt retirement charge is no longer necessary, since the debt has allegedly been paid off.

Hudak was wise to go into politics, because he certainly wouldn’t have lasted long as a loan officer at a bank with his funny math. He claims that Ontario hydro customers have paid back the debt by having paid back the principal on it. Wouldn’t it be nice to say you’ve paid off your mortgage by only making principal payments and not any interest? Yes, so long as you’re not the bank.

While the Ontario Liberals, dubbed the Fiberals in some quarters, have a deservedly tarnished image as a result of some of their bogus promises, such as their failed promise not to raise taxes while going on to impose a health tax and eco fees, Hudak and the PCs aren’t any more credible in my view either.

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Canadian federal election signs

Since the start of the 2011 Canadian federal election, the governing Conservatives have bribed Canadians with their own money by promising to double the annual child fitness tax credit from $500 to $1000, and introducing an adult fitness tax credit of $500 per year starting in 2015-2016, when they claim the budget will be balanced. That is, despite not foreseeing the massive budget shortfalls starting in 2008, and not being likely to form a majority government in order to have a mandate for that long.

That follows up with their 2006 election campaign bribe of a one percentage point cut to the national sales tax, and a further one made ahead of schedule, in place for the 2008 election campaign.

What makes these “promises” a bribe is their election campaign timing and lack of consistency. For instance, while the Conservatives kept their sales tax cut promises, they broke their promise not to tax income trusts after they were elected.

Lest you think this is a partisan phenomenon, the other major party in Canada, the Liberals, which governed from 1993 to 2006, also bribed Canadians with their own money with their Red Book promises. Their most notable promise that wasn’t delivered upon was to replace the national sales tax in existence in 1993.

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The province of British Columbia

Recently, someone relayed an account of the province of British Columbia’s tax and medical system, and here is part of my response:

The capital gains tax rate in B.C. isn’t 48%. Taxtips.ca shows that the highest capital gains tax rate there is only 21.85% for any gains on income over $128,800 for 2011. For the average B.C. taxpaper, it is far less, at either 11.35% or 14.85%.

As for the 12% sales tax, it has a 5% federal component and a 7% provincial component. That is, the B.C. government is only taking 7%, whereas the 5% sales tax is paid anywhere in Canada. While few like paying taxes, it’s a constitutional tax in both Canada and according to the principles and letter of the law of the original U.S. Constitution.

You said you had a friend in B.C. who had to wait four and a half years for a hip replacement. The B.C. government reports that between July 1 to September 30, 2010, the median wait time for hip replacements was only 11.6 weeks.

That’s for people admitted to a waiting list based on a doctor’s medical assessment. If you’re not admitted, then you’re also not getting any hip replacement in the U.S. if you don’t have the money or private health insurance to pay for it.

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As of September 20, 2010, Wikipedia states that Canada’s Goods and Services Tax “is a multi-level value added tax introduced in Canada on January 1, 1991.

A sales tax is “a tax levied on the sale of goods and services that is usually calculated as a percentage of the purchase price and collected by the seller.

A value added tax is “an incremental excise that is levied on the value added at each stage of the processing of a raw material or the production and distribution of a commodity and that typically has the impact of a sales tax on the ultimate consumer.

From the Canada Revenue Agency’s “How GST/HST works,” no mention is made of it being a value added tax.

Confusion may arise, however, with businesses having to pay the GST/HST on most of their purchases. However, it states:

They can claim an input tax credit, to recover the GST/HST paid or payable on the purchases they use in their commercial activities.

Even without the rebate, it still wouldn’t be a value added tax, since the full tax is applied, not an incremental amount.

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On May 1, 2010, Erskine Overnight interviewed the founder of the Free State Project.

Some highlights of the “Free State” New Hampshire were:

  • Ranked the most free state for the third consecutive year.
  • No state income or sales tax, no general corporate state tax or tax on machinery.
  • The lowest per capita government spending of any state.
  • The third-highest household income of any state.
  • The lowest per capita crime rate of any state, and the fewest number of police officers per capita.
  • The governor can’t spend more than $5000 on anything without the authorization of the executive council.
  • Legislators only paid $100 a year and serve two-year terms.
  • Open carry without a license and concealed carry on a “shall issue” basis.
  • No seatbelt or helmet law for adults.

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