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Henry BauerDr. Henry Bauer, author of Dogmatism in Science and Medicine: How Dominant Theories Monopolize Research and Stifle the Search for Truth, was my guest on the October 6, 2013 episode of Exposing Faux Capitalism. The commercial-free archive can be found here.

We discussed the following issues:

– He was retired in 2004 when he started looking into official statistics about HIV/AIDS
– He was surprised by statistics put out in the 1980s by the U.S. Army, where teenage female army recruits tested positive equally with the male recruits, despite AIDS overwhelmingly affecting males at the time
– He came to document big discrepancies between HIV and AIDS statistics with regard to age, sex and race
– E.g. Younger women testing more positive for HIV than younger men
– He concluded that HIV is not only not a sexually transmitted disease — it’s not even infectious
– He asked the Centers for Disease Control and the Army AIDS research unit to show him where he got things wrong
– They confirmed that he was right about irregularities in the HIV/AIDS data
– They said racial differences can be explained on behavioural grounds
– He uncovered data that showed otherwise
– Said it was difficult to find a publisher on these matters nowadays, so he was thankful for his publisher

– Modern science has developed in 3 stages
– It started in 16th century with Galileo and Newton
– Early scientists doing it out of sheer curiosity, no conflicts of interest
– Through early 19th century, being a scientist became a career
– Used to be that the way you could advance was by doing good science
– Middle of 20th century was beginning of big change in science
– Radar, penicillin and atomic bomb after WWII changed things, put science at forefront
– Huge influx of research grants — more demand by would-be scientists — strains felt by mid 1970s
– Side effect was people were tempted to cut corners
– Publish or perish academic phenomenon
– Faked results — Gallo, and Korean cloning researcher as some examples
– Conflicts of interests have become very deleterious — researchers depend on patronage — need to know the right people — Margaret Heckler’s relationship with Gallo
– String theory clique — said it’s more a hope than anything else, and it’s never been tested, and has never made a useful prediction

Control of modern science done through:
– Purse strings
– Journals
– Conferences
– Professional associations
– Media

– Difference between benevolent interests of vast majority of individual scientists and doctors and corporation’s requirement to maximize profit for shareholders
– Came from being very successful at finding cures for diseases — antibiotics
– Bad Pharma by Dr. Ben Goldacre in Britain, for the Guardian – said nothing good has come out of drug industry in past 20 years
– Drug companies only have to produce a drug that turns out better than placebo
– Statins, blood pressure reduction medicines examples of flawed research
– Global Warming, HIV/AIDS, Big Bang Theory, plate tectonics, Alzheimer’s
– Overwhelming govt funding, societal importance of science, centralized control
– Flawed Peer review process
– Importance of tier-one journals
– He recommended Spacedoc.com by Dr. Wayne Graveline – astronaut in American astronaut program
– Graveline took Lipitor, lost his memory, stopped taking it, regained his memory
– A discussion about blood pressure, and how modern medicine doesn’t factor age into their diagnosis of “high” blood pressure

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Henry BauerDr. Henry Bauer, author of The Origin, Persistence and Failings of HIV/AIDS Theory, and Dogmatism in Science and Medicine: How Dominant Theories Monopolize Research and Stifle the Search for Truth, will be my guest on Exposing Faux Capitalism on October 6, 2013 at 8 PM Eastern for both hours.

It was Dr. Bauer’s book on HIV/AIDS, subsequent to Dr. Peter Duesberg’s book, that led me to conclude in 2008 that HIV was not proven to be the cause of AIDS, and I had the pleasure of meeting both at the 2009 Rethinking AIDS conference.

For more on the AIDS scam, see here.

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On October 22, 2009, Charlie Rose conducted one of the most impressive interviews with any political leader I have ever seen. Former Prime Minister of Singapore, Lee Kuan Yew, who transformed the country from third-world status in 1965, to one of the “Asian tigers” and leading port city in the world, by 1990. His intelligence, focus, communication skills, and, in my estimation, impeccable and accurate insight, show how he accomplished what he did. I believe the U.S., Europe, and people from all around the world would do well to heed his words.

The major world changes currently taking place, and the 300-year recovery of India and China:

LEE KUAN YEW: I see in Iraq and Afghanistan as distractions. That is not going to change the world whatever happens in Iran or Afghanistan, because the major changes that are taking place is the recovery of China, and to a lesser extent of India, places occupied three centuries ago before western colonization blanketed them.

Three centuries ago, they were, between the two of them, 60 percent of the world GDP, just the population and the production they put out.

On when China will catch up to the U.S. economically:

LEE KUAN YEW: Even in three decades it won’t reach its full strength. In three decades its per capita is still about one-third of America.

CHARLIE ROSE: It’s gross domestic product.

LEE KUAN YEW: For it to reach America’s standard of living and standard of technology will take more than 100 years.

On India compared to China:

LEE KUAN YEW: (INAUDIBLE) . if India were as well-organized as China, it will go at a different speed, but it’s going at the speed it is because it is India. It’s not one nation. It’s many nations. It has 320 different languages and 32 official languages.

So no prime minister in Delhi can at any one time speak in a language and be understand throughout the country. You can do that in Beijing.

On Japan’s future demographic and financial challenges:

LEE KUAN YEW: I think the Japanese need an overhaul.

CHARLIE ROSE: In terms of their political system?

LEE KUAN YEW: Yes, and in terms of their acceptance of immigrants. Their birth rate — their fertility rate is just slightly higher than ours. We’re 1.29 and they’re 1.30. They are shrinking.

But Japan does not want immigrants, so they’re stuck. Today they have 3.2 working persons to support one adult. In 2055, they’ll have 1.2 persons to support one adult.

On the Chinese mindset:

LEE KUAN YEW: For the Americans, you have got to cease to think in terms of the Chinese as they are today. The Chinese as they are today are people who have been suffering for a very long time, especially under Mao, and who feel that the world is cruel to them. And therefore they’re very edgy.

They are — if you talk to Chinese leaders now, those over 60, they are with Russian as their second language. In 20, 25 years time, they’re going to meet a generation who are now in the lower ranks who have been to America and Britain and Europe and will be English-speaking and have different models in their minds.

And they will know that they’re not going to be the sole power in the world. Not ever again, because this is a globalized world, and they know that they’re dependent on the world for their growth. The resources that…

The importance of technological development to drive economic and social development:

CHARLIE ROSE: Can you make an argument that a country who leads in technology and science, it will go a long way in terms of their place in the world?

LEE KUAN YEW: Yes, of course. That’s why I think the U.S. will still be a very powerful and considerable inventor and creator of new products.

On the continued essential importance of the U.S. in world affairs:

LEE KUAN YEW: I think the U.S. could be a benign stabilizer of the of the world order.

CHARLIE ROSE: But you also say with the United States, it has to realize most problems need an American participation in order to be solved.

LEE KUAN YEW: Yes, absolutely. Absolutely.

On the 21st century:

LEE KUAN YEW: Two things. First, that the 21st century will be a contest for supremacy in the Pacific because that’s where the growth will be. That’s where the bulk of the economic strength of the globe will come from.

If you do not hold your ground in the Pacific you cannot be a world leader. A world leader must hold his ground in the Pacific. That’s number one.

Number two, to hold ground in the Pacific, you must not let your fiscal deficits and dollar come to grief. If it comes to grief in the short term and there’s a run on the dollar for whatever reason, because of deficits are too big and the world — the financial community and the bankers and all the hedge funds and everybody come to a conclusion that you’re not going tackle these deficits and they begin to move their assets out, that’s real trouble.

What surprised him:

LEE KUAN YEW: That the impossible can happen. I never thought the Soviet Union would implode so easily, and I never thought the Chinese would abandon the communist system and move into the free market so readily. It was unthinkable 20 years ago.

Both have happened. The world has changed.

Who China is and where it’s going:

LEE KUAN YEW: No, you don’t have to encourage them. You just have to understand that they are — look, they don’t want to be an honorary member of the west, unlike Russia. They’re quite happy to be Chinese and to remain as such.

So when you tell them you ought to do this or you ought to do that, they say yes, thank you. And in the back of their minds, we have lasted 5,000 years. Have you?

(LAUGHTER)

The Beijing Olympics if you watch it, what was the message?

CHARLIE ROSE: We’re back.

LEE KUAN YEW: No — 5,000 years, and don’t forget, we invented all these things, and we’re going to go ahead in the next 5,000 years. It’s the only country where a language has survived 5,000 years, the only country by the present generation shares the same basic thinking as the past. And they’re very proud of it.

You read Hu Jintao’s speech on the 60th anniversary, translated on the web — what is it? We have 5,000 years of civilization. We’re going to get there.

And it’s a rousing speech. It may take us a long time, we have to work very hard. We will do it. So you don’t have to encourage them.

The imperative social responsibility of a leading world power:

What you have to get them to understand is with it goes responsibility. Hungry Africans, hungry, sick other people. This is a global problem. You can’t just take copper and gold and take it. You have to have a responsibility for the people’s whose copper and gold you’re mining. It goes with the job, and they will have to learn that.

I think they are already beginning to learn that, so they’re giving something back.

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