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Posts Tagged ‘tax’

From the March 29, 2012 news release, Ontario Increases Funding Per Student:

The 2012-13 Grants for Student Needs (GSN) will rise this coming year to $11,189 per student. That is an increase of about $4,000 per student since 2003.

According to StatsCan, the median Canadian family income in 2013 was $76,000.

From the Ernst & Young 2013 Tax Calculator, the tax bill for an Ontario median family income household was $16,967, where less than 35% of that would be provincial tax.

That is, the provincial tax bill would not exceed $6000.

Does it make any sense that the per-student funding is higher than the median family household income?

When it is said that private education isn’t affordable for most with the same approach as public education, that is true, and that’s precisely because the public education system isn’t financially sustainable.

In a free market of allowing for an opt-out of public education, education wouldn’t be this expensive, just as food and basic shelter isn’t expensive enough for the vast majority of people in the Western world.

The claim is made that education is a public benefit and therefore the public should pay for public education, regardless of how many children one has who attend public school. Indeed education is a public benefit, but how are families incapable of providing that benefit to their own children, through private means?

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U.S. ConstitutionJudge Douglass Bartley, a former Wisconsin tax court judge and author of the four-volume series (three already completed), The Kiss of Judice: The Constitution Betrayed: A Coroner’s Inquest and Report, is scheduled to be on Exposing Faux Capitalism with Jason Erb on Truth Frequency Radio, September 1, 2013 at 8 PM Eastern for the full two hours, for the second part of our in-depth discussion of the United States Constitution.

For his previous interviews, see:

1) An interview with constitutionalist judge, Douglass Bartley, on Radio Liberty with Dr. Stan Monteith, December 18, 2012

2) Exposing Faux Capitalism with Jason Erb: Episode 18: Interview with constitutionalist judge, Douglass Bartley

Update: Judge Bartley was unable to make it for this second interview due to personal circumstances. Stay tuned for details about the upcoming fourth volume of his book.

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taxes

It is common in libertarian circles to hear the blanket catchphrase, “taxation is theft.”

It is completely untrue, of course, since indirect taxation isn’t theft, since you are voluntarily choosing to pay the tax by freely choosing to buy a product, in the case of retail sales taxes.

This blanket statement is an example of one of the mantras of keyboard commandos on libertarian blogs, like the derision of “fiat money,” in reference to money not backed by gold or silver, despite fiat money meaning money issued by the sovereign, which also includes gold and silver coins issued by the government.

While I have sympathy for the argument that taxation is theft if you are a voluntaryist, that criticism is mitigated by evidence that, taken as a whole, could be construed as evidence of the person’s consent.

I’m referring to the use of a birth certificate, a Social Security Number, a driver’s license, government-issued currency, and voting.

A birth certificate is government-issued evidence of a birth, but if you are using it for your identification, you are recognizing the authority of the government, which is unnecessary, and totally voluntary.

A Social Security Number is a tricky matter, since regardless of the constitutionality of the personal federal income tax, if the mafia tells you to pay up or else, I don’t advise you to tell them to take a hike, as there could be — and usually are — serious consequences. This is certainly the case with not paying your personal federal income taxes, as Ed and Elaine Brown of New Hampshire found out the hard way.

But if you’re using your SSN as optional identification or not going out of your way to legally minimize your tax bill as much as possible, then I construe that as part of the evidence of your consent to be governed.

A driver’s license is necessary to drive a vehicle, but not necessary to travel in a car without transporting anyone for a fee. The proof of this is that no lawyer in the United States will say that you don’t have a common law right of travel. Practicality is another matter, as you are certainly likely to get repeatedly stopped by the police for traveling without a license plate, but it’s perfectly legal, and Steve Jobs did it, showing that it’s not just for a Freeman.

If you live in a big city and choose to drive with a license, then I consider that as evidence of your lack of seriousness in thinking that all taxation is theft, as you are directly paying licensing fees and indirect gas taxes, all without the excuse of necessity or practical necessity, which would have some credibility if you are living in a small town with no, or wholly inadequate, public transit.

Federal Reserve Notes and bank credit aren’t government-issued currency, but government-issued coins are, and since they represent such a miniscule portion of the money supply, they can be avoided by truly principled opponents of taxation, and private charities could certainly use the money.

If you vote, then I consider that to be direct evidence of your consent to be governed, and the U.S. system of government isn’t a democracy, and, therefore, you don’t get to vote on every issue, but instead, you elect representatives who vote on your behalf, and if they vote to levy a direct tax on you, then you are consenting to it, unless you subsequently produce strong evidence against it and stop voting for would-be representatives.

The basic question is, what are you really doing to buck the system you purport to be against if you truly regard taxation as theft? There aren’t many who say taxation is theft and really do something about it, and hence my designation of them as the “taxation as theft” blowhards.

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The flags of Canada and the United States of A...

Some highlights, from Daily Bell regular contributor, Ron Holland, in his article, You’d Have to be Crazy To Start A Global Business in the USA — As a Public Company:

I’ll bet you don’t know that I may be the first person in recorded history to move voluntarily from the warm beach and golf resort of Hilton Head Island, South Carolina to cold and snowy Toronto, Canada. But Steve Wynn and many other entrepreneurs forced to deal with the multitude of regulatory agencies at the federal, state and local level would likely agree. America’s growing number of bureaucrats – all with their hand out to exchange fees for paperwork – can make it impossible to compete in the global economy from the US.

Frankly, I’m excited to pay equal or higher taxes to a new nation that never attempted to draft me to fight in Vietnam, doesn’t harass me or my wife when getting on a plane or crossing a border and has never made my life miserable. Also, Canada is sort of like Switzerland as the nation isn’t exactly the terrorist magnet of the world like the US and their economy is booming and its sovereign debt level is reasonable.

Note: Federal taxes are lower in Canada than in the U.S., overall. As of January 1, 2012, the top marginal personal income tax rate is 29% compared to 35%, top capital gains tax rate of 14.5% for all capital gains compared to 15% only for gains acquired over at least a year in the U.S., a top corporate tax rate of 16.5% compared to 35%, and no inheritance tax, compared to the top rate of 35% in the U.S.

Anyway, we continued to argue bureaucracy, tax-rates, crime, friendly law enforcement, victimless crimes, the Patriot Act and how the American sovereign debt, the dollar and the nightmare of our political institutions – except for the Ron Paul Campaign – threatens every American citizen and business. I lost the argument so I’m now moving to Canada to become CEO of a new start-up company with a viable solution for people suffering from the effects of unwanted hair loss and baldness – both males and females.

For more on why Canada is more pro-business than the U.S. these days, see:

1) Canada more economically free than the United States for a third year in a row: Heritage Foundation
2) Canada the best place for business in 2011: Forbes
3) Still think Canada is more socialist than the United States? The joke’s on you

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The Corporation

A caller to Washington Journal’s C-SPAN confronted a Heritage Foundation spokesman on the 35% U.S. corporate tax rate (starting at 18:00).

She asked him to name a single corporation that effectively pays that rate.

The spokesman admitted that the actual effective tax rate that is paid by most corporations is around 18%, or about half that of the top rate before any deductions.

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Income tax

Some politicians talk about a flat income tax (U.S. Republican presidential candidate Steve Forbes in 1996 and 2000), and some claim to have implemented such a tax (the Canadian province of Alberta in 2001).

Nearly all, if not all, so-called flat income taxes proposed by politicians and implemented by various states, are not flat.

They say it’s a flat tax because it only has one tax rate, but that’s not true. In 2011, Alberta has a basic personal income tax exemption of $16,977 CAD.

Therefore, Alberta has two tax rates. 0% if you make between $0 and $16,977, and 10% on whatever you make in excess of that.

The only truly flat personal income taxes are to be found wherever there are no personal income taxes, such as Texas, Florida and the state of Washington.

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