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Posts Tagged ‘taxes’

Exposing Faux Capitalism with Jason Erb, April 12, 2014 on Truth Frequency Radio audio here:

Action-packed, energetic show! Bitcoin, Libertarian interview, Lyndon LaRouche’s disinfo, “Multicultural Madness,” Andy Gause on Karen Hudes’ gold claims, Lew Rockwell tones down an-cap rhetoric, his phony anti-state slogan, and paying taxes under protest of duress.

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My finding of this statute allowing for recovery of the payment of property taxes in Washington State under protest of duress is in response to a commenter laughably claiming that purported anarchist, Lew Rockwell, seeking a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt status for the Mises Institute wasn’t a voluntary agreement.

Here’s what a real anarchist would do if he/she chooses to pay taxes, and that’s pay under protest of duress, as I suggested in my response to his comment.

From the Washington State Department of Revenue’s document, Paying your Property Taxes Under Protest:

To preserve your right to seek a court ordered refund, you must submit a separate written statement to the county treasurer at the time you pay the tax stating (1) you are paying the tax or a portion of the tax under protest and (2) all of the reasons why you believe the tax paid is unlawful or excessive.

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Nice to see my Canadian federal tax dollars hard at work. Apparently the very mention of Israel’s Internet Task Force to combat “hate” is worthy of being censored on Canada’s public broadcaster’s site, cbc.ca.

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Broadcasting from the new time of every Saturday from 8 to 9 AM EST, I covered the following issues on the January 26, 2014 episode of Exposing Faux Capitalism with Jason Erb on Truth Frequency Radio:

Canada more economically free than U.S. for five years in a row, propaganda piece on paying higher taxes and Canada’s central banking and political figures want Canadians poorer with lower dollar.

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Brian AlexanderCanadian Freeman, Brian Alexander, the subject of some recent hit pieces against him, is scheduled to be on Exposing Faux Capitalism with Jason Erb, September 15, 2013 at 8 PM Eastern on Truth Frequency Radio.

I found it worthy to counter the overwhelmingly negative comments from readers to the Toronto Star article, stemming mostly from the Freeman movement being misunderstood.

Here are my comments that the censors kept up on the site:

Some taxes are necessary to pay for legitimate government services. We got by fine in Canada before WWI without a personal income tax. Is the private sector, which still makes up the bulk of our economy, really that inefficient in providing these additional goods and services on a voluntary basis, that our government is providing by force?

They’re not “anti-government”. They’re pro, limited government — government limited to the protection of life, liberty and property. That, therefore, does not include most of what Canada’s federal and provincial governments engage in today (i.e. telling us what we can and can’t consume, redistributing wealth from average people to wealthy land developers, bribing us with our own money, …). The U.S. is a great example now of what happens when government becomes increasingly unlimited.

They’re not saying they don’t want roads, or don’t want to pay for them. They object to being forced to pay for them. It would be nice if gas taxes actually went directly and only to pay for roads, instead of the general revenue, where it can be spent on whatever politicians decide, including paying interest on our massive debt incurred from extravagant spending.

If you don’t like it, get out.” — A lot of Canadian hi-tech workers, doctors and entrepreneurs did get out of Canada when we had stifling taxes in the 90s, up until we reduced them to be more than competitive relative to the U.S., with the effects being felt over the last four years when we have been ranked more economically free than the U.S. for the first time ever.

And here are the ones that they removed, keeping this important information away from subsequent readers:

“He drives without a license” — it’s lawful to travel on public roads without a license. Getting a license entitles you to be a commercial driver. Of course you will run into all sorts of problems travelling without a license, and there are some public safety benefits to travelling with one, but it is our right to do so without having a license to “drive”.

@Couch Potato: It’s an offense if you have a license and don’t have it in your possession, or if you’re driving someone for a fee without a license. You really need to read the Highway Traffic Act carefully, as I have, and study the legal meaning of words like driver, license, lawful, legal, statute, right and privilege.

I hope you’re not implying that being insured means safer roads. New Hampshire has no mandatory auto liability insurance, and it has among the safest roads in the U.S., in large part because individual drivers will be held fully and personally liable for any negligence, instead of relying on other lottery ticket (insurance) holders to pick up the tab.

Drunk driving is a separate issue. In that case, you’re potentially capable of posing a clear and present threat to others on the road, and drunk drivers can be dealt with criminally independently of whether they are licensed or not.

Drive without one, no, but travel, yes. We have a common law right to travel. Driver is a legal term meaning you are licensed to transport others for payment. Steve Jobs used to drive without a license [plate] and there are a few in U.S. states I know of who have done it. Canada is no different, in principle, being a common law jurisdiction. Of course you will be repeatedly stopped and detained by police, if you are going about your business lawfully, but it’s still your right.

He [Oliver Wendell Holmes] said [“taxes are what we pay for a civilized society”] that in the U.S. in 1935 — back when federal spending was 13% of GDP, from official historical tables. In 2011, it was 38.9%. Only anarchists argue for no government. The question is, are we getting our money’s worth these days?

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English: Handcuffs Handcuffed Handcuff Hinge H...

IRS officials in the United States have claimed that paying your personal income taxes is voluntary, as seen in Aaron Russo’s documentary, America: Freedom to Fascism.

While Canada’s tax collection agency, the Canada Revenue Agency, is considered to be more reasonable than the IRS, as evidenced, for example, by the ability to anonymously settle taxes in arrears, there is this August 20, 2012 Canadian Press article, Canada looking to collect on millions in unpaid fines, which states:

The federal government currently has several options to collect outstanding fines. They include negotiating a payment schedule with the debtor, seizing assets or garnishing wages, setting off the debt against any income tax refunds and sales tax credits, suspending or denying federal licences and permits, or — as a last resort — sending a debtor to jail.

Around 150 people were jailed between April 2010 and March 2011 for refusing to pay their fines, the annual report notes.

Therefore, I don’t feel bad for my strong words when a canvasser for Plan Canada was no longer interested in making her pitch to me after I had pointed out why I won’t knowingly donate money to any organization that directly participates in the AIDS scam, because of thugs like Robert Gallo and Anthony Fauci sitting on their taxpayer-funded perches and having their agents forcibly extract money for their scam ultimately at the literal barrel of a gun if you refuse to pay any part of the $300 billion in federal AIDS funding to date.

There is, however, a distinction between voluntary and involuntary taxes, and their propriety, as I pointed out in my article, The “taxation is theft” blowhards.

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English: GO Transit 8010 at Plat2008-09-13form...

The Drummond Report contained this GO Transit recommendation:

GO Transit does not charge for the use of its parking facilities and though it may seem trivial, Drummond points to that cost of providing parking spaces is considerable. The report recommends being charg[ed] for parking at GO Transit parking lots.

But what about eliminating all commercially viable GO Transit routes, entirely? I understand that this province is more than a political unit, and I like it that way. Therefore, I don’t personally have a problem with my tax dollars going to connect the densely populated areas to some of the least densely populated areas in the name of provincial unity, but is it any wonder that Greyhound threatened to, and did, terminate unprofitable routes?

Indeed, some of them were unprofitable, because, like in most industries, executive compensation wasn’t up for negotiation, and cost savings had to be found elsewhere. Plus, the compounding debt as a result of our fundamentally unsustainable compound interest-based monetary system.

To me, it’s ridiculous that Ontario taxpayers are paying to undercut commercially viable routes and transportation companies operating between high volume urban centers like Waterloo Region and Mississauga, and if Drummond was really serious about “sweeping public transit reform,” he’d call for the scrapping of all commercially viable GO Transit routes.

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