Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘U.S.’

On November 8, 2006, Michael “Mish” Shedlock was on Coast to Coast AM with George Noory, to give his economic forecast.

  • He said an inverted yield curve for U.S. treasury bonds (e.g. the 6-month bond had a higher yield than a 10-year bond did), and a decline in housing starts and permits was the best predictor of an impending recession. They have predicted an impending recession every time since 1959.
  • He correctly predicted that the U.S. would be in a recession in 2008. It officially started in December 2007.
  • Americans had a negative savings rate since 2005. By February 2007, Americans had a negative savings rate for 21 consecutive months.
  • He sold a 3-bedroom, 1-bathroom house in Danville, Illinois for $14,000. A friend of his said a comparable house in Washington, D.C. would have sold for around $200k.
  • By 2006, Japan had experienced 18 consecutive years of declining real estate prices.
  • The major Japanese stock exchange index, the Nikkei 225, went from a high of around 40,000 to a low of around 7,000. Specifically, a high of 38,957 on December 29, 1989 to a low of 7,021 on March 10, 2009 — a decline of 82% over nearly 20 years.
  • Japan had a central bank rate of 0.25%, which the U.S. central bank, the Federal Reserve, adopted in December, 2008.

Read Full Post »

This October 9, 2009 article shows a U.S. Customs form with an SDR (Special Drawing Right) value.

This isn’t a recent phenomenon. The use of SDRs by U.S.  federal government institutions goes further back than 2009. According to the United States Postal Service 2003 Annual Report, “The majority of our international accounts are denominated in Special Drawing Rights (SDRs).

According to the IMF Factsheet on SDRs, “The SDR is an international reserve asset, created by the IMF in 1969 to supplement its member countries’ official reserves. Its value is based on a basket of four key international currencies (U.S. dollar, Euro, Japanese yen and pound sterling), and SDRs can be exchanged for freely usable currencies.

How much have SDRs benefited the U.S. Postal Service at the expense of the U.S. dollar?

On December 31, 2002, 1 USD = 0.7382 SDR
On October 18, 2009, 1 USD = 0.6280 SDR

There was a 15% decline in the USD from December 31, 2002 to October 18, 2009.

It’s not just the illegal Federal Reserve that’s been undercutting the U.S. dollar. The constitutional U.S. Postal Service and U.S. Customs are also in on the act.

Read Full Post »